How to Make an Action Plan (Example Included)

Whether at home or at work, we all have goals. And to get there, we need action plans to get us started and keep us productive.

What Is an Action Plan?

What is an action plan? Generally, it’s a proposed strategy or course or action. Specifically, in project management, it’s a document that lists the steps needed to achieve a goal. That is, an action plan clarifies what resources you’ll need to reach that goal, makes a timeline for the tasks to get to that goal and determines what team members you’ll need to do it all.

An action plan is a document that documents the project. That is, it is a detailed list of the work that must be done to complete the goal of the project. It outlines what resources you’ll need to achieve that objective and what your timeline will be, including the tasks that are involved in getting from the start of the project to the finish.

Not only are you figuring out the tasks and timeline, but you’ll also determine who you’ll assemble for your team to work on those tasks.

Steps for an Action Plan

The benefits of an action plan are simple: you have now outlined what course and what resources are needed to reach your stated goal in the project. By having this all collected in a document, you can more successfully plan out how to achieve this.

People get overwhelmed by jargon when having to plan out a project, but the word action everyone can understand.

The fundamentals to getting an action plan together for any project, follows these four basic steps:

  • Step 1: Create a simple planning template to collect tasks, deadlines and assignments. This is the place where everything task-related goes in your project action plan, so you have a place for all this crucial information.
  • Step 2: Use a tool to keep you on task. That can be as simple as a sheet of paper or a digital template, like a spreadsheet, but there are more robust options available, like task management software, so you’ll want to research and see what’s best for your project plan
task management software for action plans
Task management features in ProjectManager.com—Click to learn more!
  • Step 3: Onboard everyone into that tool so it works for the team. Make sure the team knows how to use it. Whether that’s a meeting on process or a more structured training session, you want everyone to be able to use the tool before they start working on the project.
  • Step 4: Step up alerts that work to help you become more effective. Automate a lot of the busy work so you’re free to do the more hands-on management. Alerts are a great way to keep you abreast of the project’s progress without constantly pulling you away from your other duties.

The alerts can be used to notify changes in tasks and if any have been added, and there’s always a need to manage tasks better. They can also note the completion of a milestone, which is a major phase of the project. Finally, alerts can act as notes for feedback on tasks, documents and more.

Action Plan Tips

Once you got an action plan, how do you work with it to run a successful project? Here are some tips to help with implementing your action plan included:

pm software for making action plans

  • Step 1: Focus on priorities and what is due now
  • Step 2: Mark completed tasks complete
  • Step 3: Assign someone to every task
  • Step 4: Discuss pending or last tasks

Action Plan Template

Some people like to make things from scratch, while others prefer a short cut. While there are advantages to making your own pie crust, so to speak, there are also the cons of time and effort, not to mention you just might not be that great at making a pie crust.

Of course, we’re not talking about pies but action plans. If you want help in getting started with your action plan, why not go to the experts. ProjectManager.com is built on years of knowledge of project management and we’ve shared that knowledge with templates to get your started on the right foot and make sure you’ve not forgotten any vital steps.

Our free action plan template creates the pie crust for you, so you can add whatever ingredients you care to, whether baking a savory or sweet concoction. Happy baking!

Action Plan Example

To further illustrate the importance of an action plan, let’s take our pie example on step further and put it into an action plan.

Tasks

Start with the priority of your tasks, for example, you need to make the crust, but might not need the powdered sugar on top as a final ornamental touch. Determine what tasks are high, medium and low priority.

Once you have the priority clearly planned out, then you need to make a list of all the tasks, which would include things like deciding on what kind of pie you’re going to make, the ingredients you’ll need and materials, such as a pie tin and baking utensils. There’s the mixing of ingredients and cook time. All these tasks must be listed.

Note Phases and Assignments

Would you preheat the oven as you’re making the pie crust? No. The pie crust probably will be made the night before. This is why it’s important to note all the phases of the project. You’ll also want to make assignments. If this pie is part of a larger Thanksgiving dinner, you might want to get the whole family involved. Give each member a task, from buying the ingredients to clean up.

Track Progress

Once you start the project, you’ll need to chart the progress of the work being done. This leads us to the timeline, where you’ll have a start and due date for each of your tasks, as well as how long you plan for it to take, so you can use this as a baseline and make sure you’re staying on target as you cook.

Note Resources

Finally, your pie action plan will list resources. Who is responsible for which task, what materials are involved? What are those costs? You also should have a section in the action plan for notes that don’t fall into any of the other categories, like dad’s eating too many slices, time to re-up that gym membership!

How ProjectManager.com Can Help Your Action Plan

If you’re looking to make an action plan and then take action on it by executing, monitoring and reporting on a project, then you’ll want ProjectManager.com. Our cloud-based project management software can import your action plan into an online Gantt chart.
gantt chart for procurement management
From there you can assign tasks and give teams a collaborative platform to comment and share relevant documents. Dependent tasks can be linked to avoid bottlenecks, and when things change, the schedule can be easily edited by simply dragging and dropping start and end dates.

Try ProjectManager.com for free with this 30-day trial and take positive action.

Manage Your Project with an Action Plan

Getting a plan together is only the first part of managing a project. Remember, it’s not something to write and put away, but a living document that should follow you throughout the life cycle of the project. Jennifer Bridges, PMP, offers more tips on action plans in the video below.

How to Make an Action Plan (Example Included) 1

Here’s a screenshot for your reference:
project planning fundamentals
Pro-Tip: Once the action plan is done, the team is going to have to manage their tasks. One of the best ways to keep them on track and you aware of their status is by getting an online PM software tool that reports in real-time.

Thanks for watching!

(This post was updated November 2019)

Transcription:

Today, we’re talking about how to make an action plan. What I’ve learned in working with some teams is that the word “Gantt chart” or “project schedule” or “project plan,” can just seem too overwhelming.

But it’s hard to refute the term “action plan.” I mean, we all have to take action in order to get the project done. So, today I wanna talk about a few fundamentals and a few tips to build an action plan.

So, first of all, you wanna create a simple template to save time. So, what’s in the template? When you’re creating an action plan, you wanna know what is the action step? When is it due? And who is it assigned to?

We also wanna use a tool to keep you on task. By using a tool, a specific online tool that everyone’s using, then everyone has access to online and real-time data.

And number three is you wanna onboard everyone into the tool, so that it works for everyone and not just a few people. By having everyone committed to using the same tool, then you ensure that you have real-time data that everyone can access.

The fourth one is to set up alerts that work to help you become more efficient. Well, these are some things like tasks. By having alerts on when tasks are added or changed, it helps you become more efficient in what you’re doing, helps other people on the project be alerted to the changes. Also, when milestones are completed, that way, everyone knows when major things have occurred or completed on the project.

And then notes. Notes are great for collaborating on tasks or even documents, say, like your requirements documents or some other documents that are important for the project.

So here are a few tips.

Number one: focus on the priorities of what is due now. That way, people, or team members, don’t get overwhelmed by looking at all the things that are done, but they get focused on “Let’s get these completed now.”

Number two: mark completed tasks as completed. That way, you don’t have to keep looking at the same tasks. They’re already finished, done, completed. Get them out of the way, so you don’t keep looking at them.

Number three is assign someone to every task. You wanna be sure that you know who is accountable for every task. And that way, if you have questions, something’s not getting done, you know who to go to.

And number four is discuss pending or late tasks. You wanna be sure that you find out when there are barriers or reasons why some things aren’t getting done. Sometimes they need you and your help to get things done.

So, these are the fundamentals and a few tips to help you make your action plan. And if you need a tool that can help you manage and track your action plan, then sign up for our software now at ProjectManager.com.

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