Washington Press Corps Veteran Ilyse Veron Takes Helm of The Public Manager

The Public Manager, a quarterly journal about empowering government and developing leaders, announces an editorial change in the Spring 2011 issue. Washington press corps veteran Ilyse Veron will take over as editor, according to the journal’s publisher Carrie Blustin, while longtime editor Warren Master will assume a new role as Editor-at-Large. “For eleven years Warren Master kept readers on the leading-edge with innovative public management articles,” said Blustin. “We look forward to his continued contributions as Editor-at-Large, anchoring interviews for the journal’s new podcast series, sharing insights in his blog, Agile Bureaucracy, and presenting at our events.” “This change brings new opportunities to provide more timely content and perspective,” Ms. Blustin continued. “Ilyse Veron brings years of award-winning experience covering media, technology, and public affairs, including actions of every federal department and agendas of multiple presidents. And, she’s done it for CQ and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, among others.” Master’s final spring issue centers on public managers’ preparations for climate change. Ms. Veron’s first issue, due out in June, will offer a forum on 21st century government – its technology, performance, and talent management. The summer issue of the journal will launch Ms. Veron’s new column, Editorial Perspective, and other features. Ms. Veron joined The Public Manager after years of producing events, programs, and reports with MacNeil-Lehrer Productions, and she has already begun blogging and podcasting along with Mr. Master on management issues at www.thepublicmanager.org. Ms. Veron’s career began at The Brookings Institution, followed by years at Congressional Quarterly. In the mid-90s, she served as principal researcher on The System, a book by David Broder and Haynes Johnson. From 1995-2002 she reported for the NewsHour on national and business news, earning an Emmy award for coverage of the Justice Department’s case against Microsoft and recognition from the UCLA Anderson School of Management. Since 2002 Ms. Veron has specialized in outreach and project management, working on citizen events and broadcasts such as PBS’ By the People and “Bernanke on the Record,” and she has developed content on various media platforms for nonpartisan nonprofits with a federal focus. Her freelance bylines have run on Scripps Howard Wire Service, Wired.com, Foxnews.com, and elsewhere, most recently in Education Week’s Digital Directions magazine. About The Public Manager The Public Manager is a unique, editorially independent quarterly journal about government leadership that works. Focused on empowering and developing leaders, it publishes ideas of experienced professionals about critical public management issues including budgeting and accountability, technology and innovation, and the people who make it happen. Additionally, with events and web postings, it fosters a community for current, former and future managers to share best practices and resources regarding federal challenges and professional development. The Public Manager allies with the Partnership for Public Service, GovLoop, Young Government Leaders, the Graduate School, the American Society for Public Administration, and others who serve career public servants. The Public Manager is published by The Bureaucrat, Inc., a nonprofit controlled affiliate of the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD). ASTD is the world’s largest association dedicated to the training and development field whose members work in thousands of public and private sector organizations. The Bureaucrat, Inc. maintains its own corporate officer and Board of Director structure to guide The Public Manager.

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University students could use ‘corporate skills’ to gain extra marks

(From telegraph.co.uk) Giving a good presentation or running a workshop could be enough to earn additional credits on all undergraduate courses under proposals drawn up at the University of Leicester. Paul Jackson, director of student support and development, said the university was “looking closely at how to embed corporate skills into the curriculum at the undergraduate stage”. University College London is understood to be examining ways of translating job skills into degree credits, while Durham University could also give students additional marks for work experience. Karen Barnard, head of careers at UCL, said the university’s council was “quite keen” on the idea of “some form or skills accreditation”, while Professor Anthony Forster, pro-vice-chancellor for education at Durham, said the university was considering awarding academic credit “for student employment or short-term community and work-based placements that have involved the application or development of academic knowledge and skills.” Read more.

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UK: Workplace morale at-all time low

Workplace morale has hit an all-time low, with record falls in job satisfaction and two out of five personnel saying they would leave their current employer if they could find a better job. According to a survey among 2,000 staff undertaken by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), job satisfaction has dropped to its lowest ever level of +35 compared with +36 last quarter and a high of +46 in the summer of 2009. The findings were backed up by a study of 4,000 people undertaken by career counselling organisation Chrysaliscourses.co.uk, which revealed that three out of five workers were unhappy in their current post, with 63% saying that they would like to get out as soon as possible. Unhappy or unhelpful colleagues, having to work long hours and poor pay were the main causes of dissatisfaction, but 35% also said that they felt their hard work was ‘completely unappreciated’. A further three out of 10 also said that they felt ‘completely unchallenged’ by their jobs, while one in 10 said that they could not stand their colleagues. Unsurprisingly, a fifth indicated that they felt no loyalty to their organisation as a result. Read more.

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Time Warner Cable Director of Training: Join your Local ASTD Chapter!

Our local ASTD chapters across the country received a glowing endorsement in a recent Bloomfire interview with Anthony Lewis, Regional Director of Learning and Development for Time Warner Cable in Los Angeles, CA. When discussing social media and the need for added personal engagement, Mr. Lewis noted: “A critical piece of advicemaintain your annual membership and get involved with your local ASTD chapter. In some areas, it may offer a Mentor Program. I believe that you should have a formal mentor at some point in your career. Find a mentor that is more senior than you and establish two goals he or she can help guide you toward.” The work that chapters are doing in pairing learners and mentors is clearly being recognized, and is a credit to all the hard work of our volunteer leaders!

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The stimulus package and the WLP community

The massive $787 billion dollar stimulus package (HR 1) was signed in February by the President. The bill is designed, in part, to stimulate the economy and to create millions of jobs across the US. As WLP professionals, what should you know about this bill; and what can you do to help your organization take advantage of and be supporting these opportunities? The bill will invest heavily into new technologies, infrastructure projects and health care. It will also invest in helping laid off workers get back to work. Also, there will be investment in training within high growth industries via grants. You will find training resources included with many of these initiatives. In one case, the bill would like to “better green” government buildings; and this investment includes $100 million in training to support those projects. But, the bulk of the training funds will be allocated through the publicly funded workforce system (Workforce Investment Act funding). You can access information about how much of these resources are coming to your communities by reaching out to your local Workforce Board executive director or the manager of you local One-Stop Career Center. As far as the grants go, if history repeats itself, these grants ($750 million), will require active private sector participation with either community colleges or higher education institutions. It would be a good idea to reach out to those leaders in those institutions to see if you can partner on an upcoming grant. Stay tuned to the Department of Labor site for more information about these grants. So, this is a great opportunity for the WLP profession to engage in the economic recovery efforts, help your organizations and your communities make the most of their investments in training and development, and do what we do best to help get the country back to work! Would you like to meet with your member of Congress while at ICE? Stay tuned for more information about our Congressional Conversations program.

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Schools hate businesses, businesses hate schools

As a gross generalization, schools hate business and businesses hate schools. Let me defend that: Schools hate business 1. Many academics view any skills that empowers an individual outside of academics as either “vocational” or “turning students into drones of capitalistic societies.” (Yet they have no problem rewarding skills that turn students into drones of academic environments.) I mention teaching subjects like “project management”and”solutions sales” to teachers and they recoil. 2. Professors are even encouraged to downplay their consulting to corporations. Even in b-school environment, what consulting is done, according the school mythology, is prostitution, a pursuit of lucre at the expense of integrity, unless it is done at the board level of a Fortune 500 company. 3. A lot of academics smile when the stock market dives, vindication of both their world view and their own personal career choice. Businesses hate schools 1. Businesses rail against classrooms, even their own training classes. Corporate people love to complain about training classes. “Classes don’t work!” “Training doesn’t teach anything.” “No one ever learned anything of important in a classroom.” Many training books and training professionals love quoting high profile individuals (such as CEO’s or brand-name consultants) hacking at classrooms, thinking “beyond the classroom.” If you listened to all of them talk, you would assume that employees are spending half of the lives trapped in basement lectures. Most people spend less time in classes than they spend waiting in line at their organization’s cafeteria. It reminds me a bit of the supporters of the a flag burning amendment. I wish people wouldn’t burn the American flag as much as anyone, but as far as I can tell, there is just not an epidemic of flag burning. And there sure is no epidemic of too much classroom training. The railing is really just posturing. 2. Business people love talking about academic reform. But when a company is performing sub-par, business people don’t talk about Xerox reform or corporate reform. They talk about change management, growth, and re-invention. They talk about “taking a short-term profit hit” to “restructure.” 3. Even amonst the corporations that do the most training, I have never seen a business sponsor an internal remedial history class, or art class, or literature class, or any kind of liberal arts experience. They say they respect it on a resume, but if you don’t arrive with it, they are sure not going to give it to you. 4. And businesses fight hard for tax breaks, which come out of school pockets. All with a big smile But both sides hide their animosity reasonably well. The development side of schools want donations from businesses. They talk to parents about preparing students for the future. Businesses want to appear helpful and benevolent and part of the community. It is only after the love-fest meetings and PR events do the real feelings emerge. And I believe the friction, the misalignment, this cold war between these two hurts students, hurts our GDP and standard of living, hurts schools, and hurts business. The Hope of T+D In our profession, literally of the people reading this blog, lies either the opportunity to bring these two worlds together, or to create a bigger wedge to push them apart. It is an opportunity (and yes, responsibility) that I hope we all consider as we present our ideas, shape our strategies, postore, define ourselves, and invest in and execute our plans.

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Risk of Losing High Performers Increases Post-Recession

(From PRWEB) — A new study shows, North American employees are twice as likely to head for the door as they were before the recession, according to the latest findings of global consulting firm BlessingWhite. An alarming 19% of high performers who scored low on job satisfaction indicate plans to leave. Another 48% are non-committal, saying they’ll “probably” stay. Christopher Rice, President and CEO of BlessingWhite, explains, “In attempts to survive the recession, organizations handed employees more work to complete with fewer resources. Now employees – especially the high performers – may be burnt out or under challenged, and they are seriously considering leaving at elevated rates.” Rice cautions that leaders should think about how to create growth opportunities and assign meaningful work to keep their top employees from walking out the door. “High performers, after months of heroics for their employers, are finally stepping back and asking, ‘What about me? What about my career?'” If management doesn’t present employees with the opportunity to pursue personal development or to engage in work that’s interesting or worthwhile, these individuals are going to take their knowledge and skills elsewhere.” Read more.

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Poll: Finding a Job Is Tough, Networking Is Key

Philadelphia, PA ( PRWEB) October 26, 2009 – Even in the best of times, finding a new job is a challenge. So it is no surprise that 42% of people polled think it would be “very difficult” to find a new job in today’s tough economy, according to a survey of more than 2,500 individuals on LinkedIn by Right Management. Right Management is the talent and career management expert within Manpower, the global leader in employment services. Forty-three percent of those responding believe getting a new job would be “somewhat difficult,” and 14% would consider it “somewhat” or “very easy.” Men and women have nearly identical opinions on job hunting prospects, while respondents whose job function is in business development or sales are more upbeat than those in finance. The older the respondent, the more likely the individual is to consider the job search difficult, which may be explained in part by their typically higher salary levels. “Losing a job is one of the top most stressful life events,” said Tony Santora, Executive Vice President for Global Solutions at Right Management. “The job search process can be an anxiety-filled experience, even in a healthy economy. So stress typically comes with the territory.” Read more.

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Philadelphia, PA: Regional Leaders Collaborate to Keep Life Science Talent Employed Locally and Fuel Industry Growth

PHILADELPHIA–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Entrepreneurship and emerging businesses are expected to play a major role in the economic recovery. Yet finding a place in the entrepreneurial world can be a challenge; especially if a professional is coming from a large company. BioAdvance, the University City Science Center and Wharton Small Business Development Center (SBDC) are collaborating to develop Career GPS, a program which is designed to help displaced biopharmaceutical professionals navigate the Greater Philadelphia region’s entrepreneurial career eco-system . Career GPS – Navigating the Job Market in the Philadelphia Region’s Entrepreneurial Life Science Community, targets the broad group of life science professionals (manager and above) across the region who are seeking new employment options. The program, which is funded in part by the Delaware Valley Innovation Network, will be held on Friday, November 20, 2009 at The Wharton School of University of Pennsylvania, Huntsman Hall. Registration details will be available at www.bioadvance.com and www.sciencecenter.org beginning on October 1, 2009. “As the recent Milken Institute study of life sciences in our region noted, Greater Philadelphia is in a unique position to redeploy displaced executives into emerging biosciences companies and new ventures and harness the region’s world-class talent to create an unparalleled global hub for new life sciences companies,” said Barbara S. Schilberg, BioAdvance CEO. “Our goal is to redeploy the region’s rich scientific expertise to trigger growth in life sciences entrepreneurship,” added Stephen S. Tang, PhD, president and CEO of the University City Science Center. “At the same time, we can create new connections between established and emerging life sciences firms.” Read the full release.

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One Version of the Future

Per Mindy B’s request, here’s my version of our future. I can elaborate a little now. As to a longer focus on workflow learning, we have several members of the LCB Blog Squad who are very involved in such efforts. I’ll encourage them to post some of their thoughts. Jay Cross and Tony O’Driscoll laid out a more detailed vision of workflow learning in the February Training. From a very high overview, I think we’ll see changes in what learning interventions are and changes in what the Learning and Development function does. Supervisors at all levels will be held responsible for the development of their employees. My growth strategy (versus developmental plan) will be focused on building my strengths and will be a matter of public knowledge so my colleagues will be able to help me meet my personal goals while we work together. Employees will be given opportunities to learn whenever, however they need. Let’s say I’m a marketing director with budget responsibility for my department. A week from today there’s a meeting to launch the budgeting process for next year’s budget. When I logged onto my work portal this morning my tablet PC reminded me of the meeting with to do’s from my supervisor’s memo. It also has organized last year’s budget, my budgeting notes, a guide from finance on corporate budget strategy for this year – with my bosses reactions and directions included. My system also gives a list of requested initiatives from my notes for meetings with my business partners, industry benchmarking numbers for similar initiatives and a reminder that I never took the training for the forecasting component of our new financial software – with a link to the online training. Outlook has even identified that my staff can meet with me at 3PM on Monday and is holding the time on everyone’s calendars waiting for my approval. Finally, I have my comments regarding budget processes for each of my direct reports culled from our reviews over the past year, L&D’s suggestions for materials to share with each, and coaching tips for me. To guide the development of interventions that anticipate employee needs, we learning professionals will have to become proficient in systems thinking, business processes, change management and strategic planning. We’ll get so close to our business partner that we’ll become one of them. Needs analysis will truly be about what is needed and what the best solution(s) is – not the best training solution. Assessment will become focused on helping employees develop self-awareness of what they need to know to execute on their business objectives and pave the way for where they want their careers headed. You asked who the vendors will be. Some will be the vendors you know today – SumTotal, GeoLearning, SAS, Oracle, etc. But don’t be surprised if you’re learning business process tools from Hyperion or Verity, synchronous meeting tools from Interwise or Skype, team/community enablement tools from UberGroups or Google and data mining and content management tools from Documentum or Fatwire. So what do you think Mindy? Are you prepared for the change?

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NEW! Upcoming Free Webinar

Check out this Month’s Free Webinar hosted by ASTD Sales Training Drivers! Give your career a boost by viewing this upcoming program presented by an experienced sales trainer, sales consultant,or learning & development professional –by checking out next month’s upcoming live webcast! ASTD Sales Training Drivers provides access to both classic and emerging best practices in a convenient, cost-effective way. These webcasts not only allow you to sharpen your thinking, but also create a great way to share that thinking with others.

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New Book Explores Overlooked Keys to Executive Success

July 22, 2010 – Greensboro, NC – How do talented managers develop into effective senior leaders? And what can organizations do to ensure this growth? Extraordinary Leadership: Addressing the Gaps in Senior Executive Development proposes some groundbreaking answers, providing strategies and tools to round out leadership skills and create a steady pipeline of top executives. A joint publication of The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) and Jossey-Bass, the book is edited by executive leadership experts Kerry A. Bunker, Douglas T. Hall, and Kathy E. Kram. It collects views on the often invisible elements of intrapersonal, relational, organizational, and contextual development from more than 20 leading thinkers in the field. “The chapters in this book address the subtle yet powerful forces that combine to differentiate outstanding leaders from also-rans,” Bunker, Hall and Kram say in the book’s introduction. “The end product is a comprehensive guide for leader development, a resource for executive coaches, human resource professionals, mentors, corporate officers, and aspiring senior leaders themselves.” The 321-page book provides techniques and strategies based on real-world examples, helping executives, mid-level managers and emerging leaders identify the issues that contribute to these leadership gaps. Such issues include the accelerated career advancement of high potential managers, the rapid pace of technology and globalization, and the importance of accountability and emotional intelligence. Leaders must now be as approachable as they are inspirational, according to the editors. To fill the gaps present in the workplace, they must demonstrate authenticity, integrity, emotional competence, and the ability to inspire leadership with and through others. In Views from the C-Suite, a chapter on intrapersonal development, former CCL Board member Naomi Marrow explains that self- assessment helps executives gain clear insight into the impact they have on others. In The How-to-Be Leader: A Conversation with Frances Hesselbein, Kathy Kram explores what it means to lead with authenticity. Other chapters with contributions from CCL include The Learning Premise: A Conversation with Peter B. Vaill by Kerry A. Bunker and CCL faculty member Laura Curnutt Santana; Developing Leaders with Cultural Intelligence: Exploring the Cultural Dimension of Leadership by Santana, Mira las Heras, and Jina Maol; Leading Inclusively: Mind-Sets, Skills, and Actions for a Diverse, Complex World by CCL Board member Ilene C. Wasserman and Stacey Blake-Beard; and a final chapter entitled Looking Forward: Creating Conditions for Extraordinary Leadership, where editors Kram, Hall, and Bunker integrate the perspectives shared throughout the book. Bunker, founder and president of executive development firm Mangrove Leadership Solutions, is a former CCL senior fellow. Kram, a professor of organizational behavior at the Boston University School of Management, is a former member of CCL’s Board of Governors. Hall, a professor of management at the Boston University School of Management, is a former H. Smith Richardson Jr. Visiting Fellow at CCL. About the Center for Creative Leadership The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) is a top-ranked, global provider of executive education that accelerates strategy and business results by unlocking individual and organizational leadership potential. Founded in 1970 as a nonprofit, educational institution, CCL helps clients worldwide align business and leadership strategy, develop the organizational environment and prepare individuals to be more effective leaders. Each year, through its proven, innovative and highly personal approach, CCL inspires and supports more than 23,000 leaders in 3,000 organizations around the world. Through an array of programs, products and services, CCL and its world-class faculty, coaches and researchers deliver unparalleled leadership development, education and research in more than 120 countries. Ranked by clients as No.3 worldwide in the 2010 Financial Times annual executive education survey and among the world’s top providers of executive education by BusinessWeek, CCL operates out of eight locations around the world. Headquartered in Greensboro, NC, CCL’s additional locations include, Colorado Springs, CO, San Diego, CA, Brussels, Belgium, Moscow, Russia, India, Africa and Singapore.

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MORE GRANTS! Health Care and High Growth Industries Wanted!

As mentioned in several previous blog postings, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allocated $750 Million to the Department of Labor (DOL) in competitive grants to help grow the energy, green and other “new economy” workers. $500 million in grants were announced earlier this summer; and last week, DOL announced the remaining $250 million for health care worker training and for “high growth industries”. The goal for DOL is to allocate 45-65 grants totaling $2-$5 million each. According to the grant announcement for health care, DOL is interested in projects that provide training and support career progression along the nursing career pathway as well as short-term skills certification or credentialing that enables incumbent workers to advance along a career ladder in health care. The options include licenses, certificates, and degrees from accredited nursing programs that lead to the Associate Degree of Nursing (ADN) or vocational licensure for LPNs and positions as CNAs. DOL is also interested in academic strategies that help incumbent workers advance from an ADN to the bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN) since many RNs with an ADN find it beneficial to enter bachelors programs to prepare for a broader scope of nursing practice. In this grant, DOL is also soliciting grant applications that address current and forecasted workforce shortages that provide workers with paths to career enhancement opportunities in high growth, high demand, and economically vital sectors of the American economy. ETA will target education and skills development resources toward helping workers gain skills needed to build successful careers in local growing industries. Required partners in this grant must include at least one entity from each of the following three categories: The public workforce investment system, such as local Workforce Investment Boards and their One Stop systems; public and private employers, such as health care providers when appropriate, and industry-related organizations; and the education and training community, which includes the continuum of education from secondary schools to community and technical colleges, four-year colleges and universities, apprenticeship programs, technical and vocational training institutions, and other education and training entities. Grant applications are due 10/5/09. Call your local partners to see how you can participate in this grant. You can find out more about this and the other grant available at the DOL-ETA web site: http://www.doleta.gov/grants/

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Integrated talent management, good HR and leadership

(From Canadian HR Reporter) — i4CP sent a newsletter recently commenting on the need for “integrated” to be added to the term “talent management” in order to update it and make it more powerful as they suggest in a new book. They mention the number of providers in the area changing names – StepStone Solutions to Lumesse and PeopleClickAuthoria to PeopleFluent. It sometimes seems as if every update of strategy requires a new name, though the new ones sometimes don’t seem much more enlightening than the old. It got me to questioning the use of the term talent management itself. I have always taken it to be an umbrella that takes in finding, recruiting, orienting, developing, managing and tracking performance and then moving people up through effective succession planning all the way through their careers. That definitely calls for integration of many HR functions and beyond, since line managers have to be central in many of the pieces – from supportive coaching on the development side to career planning conversations with individuals. They are definitely needed for effective succession planning discussions among groups of managers so everyone agrees on how to rotate people through progressively challenging assignments across different divisions to season their leadership knowledge and skills. Read more.

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How can a national ASTD member get involved with a local chapter?

The American Society for Training and Development has over 130 chapters across the country. Many national ASTD members are unaware of their local chapter and the benefits of joining as a chapter member. Both national ASTD and its chapters offer a variety of member benefits. ASTD chapter membership provides the following: National ASTD benefits are nationally centered. We are the leaders of the workplace learning and performance profession. Our magazines, industry and research reports, certificate programs, publications, and conferences are all available to members at the national level. We offer white papers and also have many social media sites which allow you to network with professionals from all over the country. As you can see, both play a major part to the make-up of your professional career. I always encourage members to take advantage of a joint membership (both national and chapter) as they each provide beneficial resources which will help you in your professional career.For a listing of all ASTD chapters please click here.

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Embracing Diversity – Women.

POST a REPLY COMMENT at the END! Your VOICE is the SALES TRAINING Industry! Sales Training Drivers is proud to bring you quality content to help build World Class Sales Organizations (no matter how many employees you have) you are all World Class to us! In the May 2010 issue of (T+D) Training and Development Magazine, an article written by ASTD correspondent writer, Aparna Nancherla, entitled “Career Pipeline Bears Pipe Dreams for Women”, was alarming at best and further builds a case for the need of higher quality coaching and diversity training for Managers (and that includes Sales Training Mangers). What does that say about the HR / Training industry? According to a report by Catalyst Director Catherine Silva, “We’ve studied the barriers facing women in their careers for years – for example, stereotypes or presumptions about their abilities or interests – we had an opportunity (with a recent study) to test whether this held true. Sampling 4,143 women and men with MBA’s, focusing on women with the same aspirations, conclusions are that men STILL had higher salaries in their first post-MBA jobs than women. Catalyst Research also showed that there are “entrenched barriers to women’s advancement, such as gender-based stereotypes, exclusion from informal networks, and lack of role models.” The Catalyst Research study further reports input suggestions from CEO’s and Senior Leaders to explore the reasons on how to work toward a solution. Here are some of their suggestions: 1. Offer additional training when employees first get people management responsibilities. 2. Examine demographics and life choices of employees. 3. Check against unconscious bias. 4. Review salary growth metrics when taking on a new position or role. 5. Make assignments based on Qualifications, not presumptions. 6. Acknowledge the inequities that are destroying the pipeline (of qualified candidates for jobs). Conclusion? WAKE UP! Say’s Catherine Silva, “Don’t expect that inequity will disappear just by giving it time and waiting it out”.

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Corporate pandemics of 2006

Inspired by a batch of recent frustrating consulting gigs, a battery of medical check-ups and the current buzz about pandemic preparedness, here are my predictions for six emerging corporate pandemics that trainers will have to deal with in 2006: 1) Ulteriorsclerosis – the clogging of an important initiative by personnel or policies, for spurious reasons that mask more pernicious ulterior motives. Widespread ulteriorsclerosis will lead to the demise of several organizations in 2006. The disease, once it takes hold and starts to spread, can only be cured by surgical OD interventions. It manifests itself in the right projects not being approved, or not moving forward, for apparently good reasons which, with persistent investigation, turn out to be fatuous. Ulteriorsclerosis is typically artificially induced by the idle, the desperate, or the power hungry, and can be career threatening to diagnose. 2) Nearly Ubiquitous Wireless Mobile Informal Learning Syndrome (NUWMILS) – the propensity to instantly learn only what one needs to learn in order to perform, when and where the performance is required. Also referred to as Schizogooglia, it will evolve in cultures where networked knowledge links of known quality and reliability become so intuitively accessible that it will be like having multiple brains in your head. Sporadic outbreaks have been occurring with increasing frequency, and now seem set to attain pandemic status in 2006. Once it loses its stigma and is accepted as a blessing rather than a curse, NUWMILS will be renamed “ambient learning” and at least three gurus will claim to have invented the term. 3) Mailanoma – the unrestrained metastasizing of productivity-sapping email, texting, and instant messaging, leading to complete breakdown of one’s ability to communicate. While much of this has been from externally inflicted spam, as 2006 progresses there will be increasing volumes of malignant messaging that are internally generated through quite unnecessary cc-ing, bcc-ing, and e-messaging of people sitting whispering distance apart. As communication is the life blood of organizations, malfunctioning of the system can cause a serious breakdown in performance – and in the ability of training to have an impact. 4) Infobesity – the deleterious effect of excessive data consumption on the fitness and agility of individual and corporate minds. With the volume of new data being produced doubling every three days (vs. every three decades a few generations ago), Infobesity will become dramatically debilitating, though it will stimulate the growth of technology filtering tools. Those who master infofiltering will jog confidently through the fog, while those who don’t will keep staggering into lampposts. Employees and teams with calcified knowledge filtering modes will become alienated and resentful, unable to compete, and decreasingly productive. Fortunately for them, they make up most of upper and middle management, and still dominate the shareholders of most large companies. So they will hold onto legacy processes and implement new glass ceilings to keep info-savvy juniors from gaining power (often by inducing ulteriorsclerosis in the relevant area). Unfortunately for their companies, the info-savvy are subversive, mutate rapidly, are well networked, and will job hop into smaller, more fluid entities that will collaboratively run competitive rings around the big corporations. 5) Organizational Incontinence – the involuntary leaking of things you’d rather not have others see. As the networked world brings on premature aging in organizations, they will start to leak at increasingly alarming rates. They will leak knowledge (IP Incontinence) as their walls become porous and their employees network outside of the company to gain the insights they need to get things done. They will leak processes, as much that used to be done in-house becomes outsourced. They will leak secrets, as staff start to blog and podcast without the censoring filter of Corporate Communications. And they will suffer from increasing motivational incontinence as employees finally lose all sense of belonging to a cohesive caring organizational family. This in turn will lead to the leaking of valuable employees. Organizational Incontinence, in all its forms, may require a significant rethink of the role of learning services, and its repositioning as an aid to the enhancement of an individual’s market value. 6) Learning Impact Myopia – the failure to expect or demand that learning initiatives have lasting effects. Like most other things in corporate life, training activities will be evaluated more and more on what effect they have on each quarter’s financial results, rendering longer term impacts irrelevant, and in turn making the development of long-term programs pointless. When trainers struggle to develop interventions that have lasting impact, they will be told that such esoteric stuff simply does not matter, and will be pressured into providing instant gratification to the bean counters. Learning Impact Myopia and Schizogooglia both seek faster short-term solutions to the expertise problems, but for different reasons. Trainers may have to selectively succumb, while still fighting for some strategic surgical impact. [Paradoxically, Surgical Learning Impact Myopia (SLIM) — the deliberate implanting or nurturing of e-learning 2.0 where appropriate — may give SLIM organizations added vigor and longevity]. Be prepared! The future will be a dangerous place if you relinquish control of your integrity to the organizational pandemics. Compliments of the season to all, and may your 2006 be filled with health, wealth, and happiness! Godfrey Parkin

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Connect with Colleagues

ASTD has helped members forge lifelong career enhancing relationships. ASTD conferences, including ASTD TechKnowledge and the ASTD International Conference & Exposition and ASTD’s Educational Programs, bring thousands of people together to talk about the latest development in learning and performance and to learn from professional experts. Listen to Dave.

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Christie Ward, CSP Joins ASTD Board of Directors

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) announces that Christie Ward, CSP, principal for the iMPACT Institute, is joining the Society’s Board of Directors for a two-year term, 2011-2012. A principal for the iMAPCT Institute since 1999, Ms. Ward seeks to align communications skills with high-performance, productivity, and effective leadership. Ms. Ward coached the World Champion of Public Speaking in 2000, and was recognized in 2004 by ASTD’s Rocky Mountain Chapter for a program that resulted in a 66 percent decrease in union grievances at AT&T in Denver. Prior to her current role, Ms. Ward served as director of training for CareerTrack, Inc., where she coached and managed more than 200 of the best professional trainers around the world. She was also recognized in 2008 and 2009 as the National Speakers Association Colorado member of the year for her work in developing the Colorado Speaker’s Academy, an innovative program for emerging speakers that generated revenue for the chapter. Ms. Ward has been involved in ASTD for 21 years, as a Rocky Mountain Chapter member, as chapter president, and as a three-year member of ASTD’s National Advisors for Chapters (NAC). Her peers elected her to Chair the NAC for 2011-2012. Ms. Ward earned her CSP (Certified Speaking Professional) designation in 2009.

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Chinese Males Are Blazing a Trail in the Workplace

(From China Daily) — In recent years, men have been entering professions that have traditionally been regarded as women’s work. Li Dabin, 39, with a master’s degree, used to be a teacher in a college in the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region in South China. But last year he quit the job to learn postnatal care and train to be a maternity matron, which encompasses the role of nanny, nurse, cook and pre-school teacher. “Actually, I wanted to be a nanny nine years ago when my child was born. I think children can benefit from a male nanny’s energy in a family. Men have an irreplaceable role in children’s development,” he said. Having finished his training, he has now set up his own domestic services company. Last year, he conducted some research in local communities in Kunming, Yunnan province, and found that there was a large demand for domestic workers, especially quality service providers. “The standards of domestic service in China are rather uneven. The education level of nannies is generally not that high,” he said. “I can see a promising future in this industry,” he added. Li expects to receive his certification and officially start his career early next year. However, he does not know if the market is ready to accept a male maternity matron. “But I believe in my professional skills and that there will be someone who will want to hire me,” Li said. He may find it hard going, though. “It’s unusual for a man to take care of a new-born baby and the mother,” said one woman in Kunming called Chen Yi. But others think some families will be more open to hiring a male nanny. “It might work for some families, especially a single mother or a family with a boy,” said a woman surnamed Liu. Read more.

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Canada: FuelCell Energy Charges up High-Potentials

Ottawa, Canada ( PRWEB) April 24, 2009 — FuelCell Energy Inc., the global leader in clean stationary electric power, implemented Halogen Software’s talent management suite globally in just six weeks, and within one appraisal cycle created a high-performance culture. The organization improved the integrity and value of its employee performance data, aligned its rapidly growing workforce around a common set of goals, and ensured its high-potential employees were recognized and nurtured. The demands of the current economic climate are putting pressure on organizations globally to quickly gain a better understanding of their workforce and align, communicate with and motivate their top performers. FuelCell recognized that, especially during this difficult economic downturn, maximizing the performance of its human capital was essential. Understanding where to allocate scarce resources and how to strategically develop talent to meet business needs is an urgent necessity for companies of all sizes. FuelCell Energy is a clear example of how quickly organizations can achieve these goals and strengthen their competitive position in the process. By automating its talent management processes FuelCell helped strengthen and streamline its rapid global expansion- growing from 150 to over 500 employees in four years. Before implementing Halogen’s solution, the organization faced a number of challenges in their performance management system, including a lack of consistency, accountability, and employee engagement with the existing process. As a result, performance reviews were not considered a valuable tool for the organization as a whole. “The HR team found the system and process painful for everyone involved and looked to overhaul it and implement an automated system,” said Sandra Mauro, HR Manager with FuelCell Energy. “Once we had decided to invest in Halogen, things began to improve quickly. We were live within six weeks of training. It was awesome. I have done a lot of software implementations in my career and I know how painful they can be. Getting Halogen up and running was painless.” Halogen Software is able to consistently implement its suite for customers under very tight deadlines, even for those with global operations, because the solution is so flexible and easily configured. This enables customers to have the Halogen applications adapt to their processes and forms-rather than the other way around. Once Halogen’s suite had been successfully implemented, FuelCell was able to address its business problems almost immediately. Availability of information and a methodology toward a high performance culture began to evolve and improve with each review process. Accountability for goals and alignment around performance is now the norm for its global workforce. The company fosters greater recognition of high performance, and nurtures employee growth via development planning and ongoing feedback. The intelligence gained through the performance appraisal process is now readily accessible and is therefore actionable, unlike with the paper-based process, which was impractical to aggregate and report on. The shift is an exciting one for the HR team. “I recommend Halogen to pretty much anyone who will listen. I talk about it all the time,” says Mauro. “We use the employee performance management system to drive a higher level of accountability. As a high-growth company, we have many employees who join our team from different companies and corporate cultures. The new system enables us to standardize performance expectations and unify our corporate culture.” (Read the entire article at Canadian Business Online.) Learn more about Halogen Software here: http://www.halogensoftware.com/

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Big Question Thought Leaders

I’m happy to announce that several thought leaders have joined together with me to revitalize the Big Question. We will likely be trying some different things over the next few months. What exactly, we aren’t sure. We’ll figure it out as we go. The goals of the Big Question will remain the same: We are definitely interested in having contributions from other Thought Leaders, so feel free to contact me: akarrer@ techempower.com if you are interested in participating. Glenn has over 10 year’s experience in the field of workplace learning and performance, and is currently the Learning and Development Manager at The Salvation Army Employment Plus in Australia. He has a particular interest in how communications technology can enhance and facilitate corporate learning and performance, and the creation of new opportunities for learning in and outside the workforce. Glenn holds a Master of Psychology degree, and enjoys Australian Rules Football, NFL and most other sports that involve a ball and action. Blog: http://www.glennhansen.tumblr.com Twitter: @glennhansen Thomas Edgerton is a performance consultant, professional coach, instructional technologist, master swimmer, and perpetual optimist. Over the years, his award winning work traverses sneaker net to the present crossing diverse industries, platforms, pedagogy, and people. Let me warn you beforehand, I am more hopeful today than at any previous point in my life. twitter: 4EFRSWM linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/thomasedgerton website: www.skilledge.net Jeff Goldman has 13+ years experience in the training and development field, including nine years designing and developing e-learning. He has a dual focus in both online learning and classroom training and has experience designing learning solutions in banking, healthcare, and for nonprofit organizations. Jeff holds a Master of Arts degree in Instructional Systems Design from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Colorado at Boulder. LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/minutebio Twitter: www.twitter.com/minutebio Holly lives on a small semi-rural island off the coast of British Columbia, Canada where she works as an independent learning strategist, advising clients thoughout their journey to e-learning. She’s particularly interested in performance support and the rise of user generated content as growth areas for traditional workplace learning. Holly’s been tinkering in the learning field for over 15 years in a variety of roles. After 12+ years in the corporate world, she decided that climbing the career ladder was not the only option and freedom 55 was someone else’s dream. She’s enjoying the diversity that consulting offers, even if the workload is daunting at times. She’s a voracious reader (mostly snobby fiction), a fair-weather sea kayaker, enthusiastic (but not particularly skilful) downhill skier and a busy mom who seeks to find time to do it all. Web: http://www.sparkandco.ca Twitter: http://twitter.com/sparkandco LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/hollymacdonald Blog: http://sparkyourinterest.wordpress.com/ Kasper has over 25 years of experience in the field of learning and user performance support. His learning experience goes from teaching, authoring textbooks, designing and creating e-Learning, knowledge management and user performance support. As a manager his experience ranges from being CEO of an early internet startup in the nineties to his current position as CEO of easygenerator. He has a passion for learning, learning technology and innovation. With easygenerator he is on a mission to make it the best e-learning authoring system in the world and innovate e-Learning along the way. He believes that we should bring (e)-Learning to the workplace and that learning content is key in reaching that goal. Blog: www.KasperSpiro.com LinkedIn, Skype, Twitter: KasperSpiro Web: www.easygenerator.com

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ASTD Sales Training Virtual Conference Series: Leadership Change at IBM Benefits Sales Learning with Paula Cushing

On October 25, the IBM Board of Directors elected Virginia “Ginni” Rometty president and chief executive officer of IBM, and a member of the board, effective January 1, 2012. She will replace Samuel Palmisano, who will remain chairman of the board. In an international company as large and complex as IBM, you may think that this is an insignificant happening from a Learning standpoint. However, because of the deep partnership that IBM Sales Learning had forged with Ginni in her senior vice president role overseeing IBM’s global sales, global strategy, marketing and communications, it is as if a member of our team has ascended to this position of global significance. Over the last 100 years, IBM has transformed its workforce many times, in many cases creating the most vaunted workforce in the technology industry, or any industry, for that matter. Through its Sales Eminence transformation, the Sales Learning team partnered with Ginni over the last three years to transform IBM’s sales force by developing and deploying innovative learning solutions that are broadening and deepening the skills, capabilities and expertise of IBM’s 38,000 sellers, accelerating their productivity and enabling them to deliver exceptional client value and grow profitable revenue. Core elements of the partnership and transformation are a newly developed and deployed T-shaped Professional Sales Model and a redesigned Sales Career Model. The T-shaped Professional Model represents the breadth and depth of the skills, capabilities and expertise that are required of all IBM sellers and sales leaders. The new design of the Sales Career Model simplified sales job roles into three career paths: industry, solution, technical. Developing and deploying these new models were significant accomplishments and could not have been achieved without Sales Learning’s partnership with Ginni, or our partnerships with other areas of the business. For a learning professional, there is no better place to be than partnered at the highest level of the business, aligning with your clients as a trusted ally, contributing as a consultant to short- and long-term strategy discussions and being an integral part of driving business success. After all, partnering is a condition of success for the learning function. But there are perks and perils associated with powerful partnerships. The learning professional that achieves eminence and delivers results knows how to earn and leverage the perks and avoid and survive the perils. In the new year, for IBM Sales Learning, our “partner” will be occupying the corporation’s CEO office, bringing with it new perks and perils for our team. We’re ready for the challenges and the opportunities, as IBM embarks on its second 100 years. Paula Cushing is Director of Sales Learning within IBM’s Center for Learning and Development, a position she has held since 2008. In this role, Paula and team are transforming IBM’s sales learning strategy by developing and deploying innovative learning solutions that are broadening and deepening the expertise of IBM’s 38,000 sellers, accelerating their productivity and enabling them to deliver exceptional client value and grow profitable revenue.

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ASTD Presents Ram Charan with its Champion of Workplace Learning and Performance Award

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented Ram Charan with its Champion of Workplace Learning and Performance Award on May 17 at the ASTD 2010 International Conference & Exposition held here. This ASTD award recognizes individuals whose advocacy, commitment, or actions in support of workplace learning and performance has influenced groups of individuals, organizations, or society. “Without learning, there is no growth,” says Ram Charan, business advisor, author, and leadership expert. Charan has spent his career studying strategy and leadership. In his 2007 book, Leadership at All Levels: Deepening Your Talent Pool to Solve the Succession Crisis, he advocates for the apprenticeship model, and calls for assigning stiff challenges to high potential employees to accelerate their growth. He believes great leaders have personal traits and skills that cannot be impacted by time in a classroom. “If you want to impact both,” he says, “you must create assignments that will take people beyond their comfort zones to discover what is inside. These apprenticeships allow absorption from other people and the learning is largely on the shoulders of the apprentice.” Charan’s introduction to business came from working in the family shoe shop in the small town in which he was raised. That background combined with decades of observing and working with successful leaders shaped his belief that business leaders learn best through a combination of experience, feedback, and self-correction. He has worked with top executives at some of the largest companies in the world, including GE, Dupont, Novartis, and Bank of America. He developed his research and observation style early in his career as a faculty member at the Harvard Business School and GE’s Crotonville Institute. Charan has sold more than two million books in the past five years. Leadership in the Era of Economic Uncertainty was published in 2009. His newest book, coauthored with Bill Conaty, is Masters of Talent and it will be published in October 2010. Through his books, as well as teaching and coaching, Ram Charan demonstrates his conviction that workplace learning is crucial to business success and affirms that people are value-added contributors.

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ASTD Presents Michael Allen with its Distinguished Contribution to Workplace Learning and Performance Award

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented Dr. Michael Allen, chairman and CEO of Allen Interactions, Inc. with its Distinguished Contribution to Workplace Learning and Performance Award on May 23 at a ceremony during the ASTD 2011 International Conference & Exposition held here. This ASTD award recognizes an individual for an exceptional contribution of sustained impact to the field of workplace learning and performance. Allen’s belief in the potential of e-learning technologies guided his more than 40 years of professional, academic, and corporate experience in the development, sales, and marketing of e-learning support systems. His time as director of Advanced Educational Systems R&D within Control Data Corporation’s PLATO project inspired him to found Authorware in 1984, the company that produced the first industry-standard e-learning authoring tool. “Technology enables, but also leads. It amplifies whatever you do,” notes Allen. “We can do a lot of damage, wasting time and money and possibly teaching the wrong thing, but when we get it right, we can do more good than ever.” Allen’s career demonstrates a commitment to developing tools that enable meaningful, memorable, and motivational e-learning experiences. Founded in 1993, Allen Interactions designs, develops, and implements interactive educational simulations for the world’s largest corporations. Allen serves as a high-level consultant for multimedia design and production groups wanting to take full advantage of interactive technologies. His numerous books, including Michael Allen’s Guide to e-Learning, feature interviews with pioneers in the field. Currently an adjunct associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, Allen is working to develop e-learning curriculum focused on reducing the spread of HIV and AIDS.

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ASTD Presents its Lifetime Achievement Award in Workplace Learning and Performance Award to Bob Eichinger and Mike Lombardo

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented Bob Eichinger and Mike Lombardo with its Lifetime Achievement in Workplace Learning and Performance Award on May 17 at the ASTD 2010 International Conference & Exposition held here. This ASTD award recognizes individuals for a body of work that has had significant impact on the field of workplace learning and performance. Eichinger and Lombardo are recognized for creating some of the seminal works in the workplace learning and performance profession, including FYI: For Your Improvement and Eight-Eight Assignments for Development in Place. Their collaboration with Morgan McCall at the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) led to one of the foundational concepts of human resource development: the 70/20/10 learning model, which postulates that 70 percent of learning and development takes place from real-life and on-the-job experiences, tasks and problem solving; 20 percent comes from other people through informal or formal feedback, mentoring, or coaching; and 10 percent comes from formal training. A fortuitous course taught in 1991 at CCL put them on the map. CCL gave the two men permission to release a competency tool they developed and they formed Lominger, Inc. the same day. The tool, called the Career Architect, has since generated more than $100 million in sales. Eichinger and Lombardo continued their partnership and devoted themselves to producing research-based and experience-tested tools and materials that would be useful to the workplace learning profession. “We were always very interested in how people solve real-world problems, and how effective people differ from average performers,” says Lombardo. Eichinger notes the pair has noticed a “significant gap between research and practice” over the course of their partnership. In 2004, the pair co-authored a book with Dave Ulrich titled 100 Things You Need to Know: Best Practices for Managers and HR. The book covers practices in recruitment, assessment, selection, development, and feedback, includes short summaries of each, and then poses a multiple-choice question that the authors answer with research findings as a backup. Eichinger and Lombardo’s firm, Lominger, was acquired by Korn/Ferry International in 2006.

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ASTD Presents its Lifetime Achievement in Workplace Learning and Performance Award to Jack Zenger

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented John H. (“Jack”) Zenger, co-founder and CEO of Zenger Folkman, with its Lifetime Achievement in Workplace Learning and Performance Award on May 23 at a ceremony during the ASTD 2011 International Conference & Exposition held here. This ASTD award recognizes an individual for a body of work that has had significant impact on the field of workplace learning and performance. Zenger is recognized for his expertise in leadership development and a career that spans more than five decades across corporate, academic, and entrepreneurial functions. His career includes roles as vice president of human resources for Syntex Corporation, group vice president for the Times-Mirror Corporation, CEO of Provant, faculty member at the University of Southern California and the Stanford University School of Business, and founder of Zenger-Miller and Zenger Folkman. “Working in these three areas has given me a unique appreciation for the role of leaders in organizations,” says Zenger. “Working internally in corporations helps me understand client needs now, and academia gave me the opportunity to see the big picture. Plus, it is an enormous reward when students say that I have helped them. I really enjoy giving people new skills that can help them on the job and in their private lives.” Zenger’s seminal works on leadership development include Results-Based Leadership, with co-authors Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood (1999); The Extraordinary Leader: Turning Good Managers into Great Leaders, with co-author Joe Folkman (2003); and The Inspiring Leader: Unlocking the Secrets of How Extraordinary Leaders Motivate, with co-authors Folkman and Scott Edinger (2009). In 2002, Zenger teamed up with Dr. Joseph Folkman to form Zenger Folkman, a professional services firm that provides consulting, leadership development programs, and implementation software for organizational effectiveness initiatives, all grounded in data backed by practical ideas. Zenger says his lifelong interest in leadership development can be traced to his childhood observations about how new leaders influenced the functions of the hospital where his father worked as an administrator.

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ASTD Presents its Dissertation Award to Sewon Kim

The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented Dr. Sewon Kim its Dissertation Award on May 23 at a ceremony during the ASTD 2011 International Conference & Exposition held here. This ASTD award recognizes an outstanding dissertation that holds major implications for practitioners of workplace learning and performance. Dr. Kim’s dissertation, titled “Managerial Coaching Behavior and Employee Outcomes: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis,” examined employees’ perceptions of the relationship between their mangers’ coaching behavior and employee affective and performance-related responses, an area which lacks empirical research. The study focused on a state government organization, and measured six outcomes: role clarity, satisfaction with work, satisfaction with manager, career commitment, organization commitment, and job performance. Collected data revealed that managerial coaching directly affected employee satisfaction with work and role clarity, and indirectly affected satisfaction with work, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment. Results also indicated that role clarity, as a direct outcome of managerial coaching, influenced job performance. Study findings demonstrate that managerial coaching motivates and satisfies employees, and improves their commitment and performance toward designated goal achievement, further supporting existing theories. This research gives a clearer picture of managerial coaching practices in organizations, and can potentially guide the use of managerial coaching competency for hiring and developing effective managers. Dr. Kim received his PhD in August 2010, and is currently an assistant professor in the Business, Management, and Economics department at the State University of New York (SUNY) Empire State.

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ASTD Certification Institute Announces Two New Recognition Programs

To underscore the value of certification to the learning and development profession and to recognize the support from thought leaders in the field, the ASTD Certification Institute (ASTD CI) announces the creation of two new award programs and encourages eligible candidates to apply. ASTD CI oversees the Certified Professional in Learning and Performance (CPLP) credentialing process. The CPLP credential was launched operationally five years ago; there are currently more than 1,000 CPLP credential holders. “We believe it is time to recognize employers and thought leaders for their commitment and support of CPLP certification and their contribution to the profession,” said Jennifer Naughton, senior director of credentialing at ASTD CI. The two recognition programs are: 1. CPLP Fellow Program – this honor recognizes thought leaders for their support of the CPLP credential and the learning and development profession. 2. CPLP Employer Award – this honor recognizes employers and the business community for their support of the CPLP credential. The CPLP Fellow Program will evaluate candidates based on four criteria: authorship; awards and recognition; influential positions held; and career achievement. A CPLP Fellow does not need to hold the CPLP credential. The CPLP Employer Award will evaluate organizations based on seven criteria: recruitment of CPLP holders; support for CPLP certification; 3-fold recognition of CPLP holders in the organization; number of CPLP holders in the organization; and demonstrated CPLP value proposition in the organization. Applications are open until September 1, 2011. The awards will be presented at the ASTD 2012 International Conference & Exposition, to be held in Denver, CO, in May.

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ASTD CEO Tony Bingham Responds to News on Training

ASTD President and CEO Tony Bingham has issued this open letter: The topic of training and its efficacy have been featured in three national newspapers this summer. USA Today opened the conversation with a June 11 article titled, ” Laid off workers retrain but end up in same spot: Jobless;” then came the New York Times with a July 18 article, ” After training, still scrambling for employment;” and most recently, an August 1 article in the Washington Post pondered, ” Maybe it’s job retraining that needs to be retooled.” The American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) would like to provide our perspective on the value of training in response to these stories. With unemployment still high at 9.5 percent, there are many who have sought to improve their skills through training and are still unemployed. This is certainly an unfortunate reality for some people, and while training alone is not a cure for unemployment; it is part of the solution for those needing different skills to succeed in the job market. To ensure that training investments are well-spent, the public and private sectors must work in partnership to make certain that training is targeted to help individuals prepare for a new occupation or career, meet available job requirements, close skills gaps, and address the hiring needs of the labor market. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the demand for highly skilled workers will continue to grow over the next decade. In Bridging the Skills Gap, a white paper released by ASTD earlier this year, we note that 85 percent of the work in the United States involves transactions-the exchange of information, products, or services. This shift to a knowledge economy is significant because it requires workers to have a higher level of skills. Tony Carnevale, director of Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, notes in ASTD’s white paper that “Recessions accelerate the trend to eliminate low-wage, low-skill jobs.” He continues, “In a recession, the economy goes to sleep, but when it awakens, there will be a need for higher-skilled people to fill skill-intensive jobs.” In a 2009 Time magazine article on the likelihood of unemployment and a decade of low job growth in the U.S., Harvard professor Roberto Mangabiera Unger noted, “making cheap low-end jobs won’t deliver a workforce capable of sustaining a competitive advantage.” The article pointed out that training helps break the cycle of low skills, low productivity, and low wages. In today’s knowledge economy, senior executives agree that systems and processes are no longer differentiators for organizations; these are becoming commodities. Today, people-their knowledge, skills, and abilities-are the competitive advantage for organizations. As the economy rebounds, organizations in the public and private sectors must strategically invest in developing the skills and knowledge of people who are working and those who want to work. Our opportunities for growth and success depend heavily on having a skilled workforce. It’s incumbent on all of us to use every available tool, including training, to achieve that potential. Tony Bingham President and CEO, ASTD

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Anne Schwartz of UPS Joins ASTD Board of Directors

The American Society for Training & Development announces that Anne M. Schwartz, SPHR, Vice President of Global Leadership Development for UPS, is joining the Society’s Board of Directors for a three-year term, 2011-2013. In her role, Ms. Schwartz is responsible for global training and leadership development, training strategy and governance, the analysis and development of learning technologies, and talent management for the enterprise. During her 24-year UPS career, Ms. Schwartz has held a variety of positions in Small Package Operations and Human Resources, as well as in non-package sectors of the business, both domestically and abroad, including UPS Supply Chain Solutions, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate strategy. Ms. Schwartz holds the SPHR certification from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and is a member of the Atlanta Human Resources Leadership Forum, ASTD.

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6 Leadership Learning Trends You Need to Know

(From the Huffington Post)–I returned from ASTD 2013 last week full of energy about the future of learning and leadership development, about advances in learning technologies, and about the integration of neuroscience into the process of learning new skills and becoming better leaders in all phases of our careers. It was energizing to be among 10,000 learning and development professionals, and to hear about some of the latest learning trends and thinking from large companies like UPS, thought leaders like Ken Blanchard and Sir Ken Robinson, and see new products and services from vendors at the Expo. Having never been to an ASTD ICE before, I wasn’t prepared for the scale and scope of the conference, and it was a bit overwhelming to try to take it all in. What I did notice were several trends that are impacting how organizations tackle learning and development: Read more

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Differentiate Yourself. Become a CPLP.

The Certified Professional in Learning and Performance (CPLP) credential is the only certification covering the entire talent development profession. Based on the ATD Competency Model, the credential provides talent development professionals the ability to prove their worth to employers and to be confident in their knowledge of the field. In this video, three Certified Professionals in Learning and Performance (CPLP) describe how earning the credential has benefited them in their careers and in their lives. They discuss the power behind the certification and the return on investment they’ve realized since earning the credential.

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CPLP What Is It and Why Is Now the Time

Is the Certified Professional in Learning and Performance (CPLP) certification right for you, and is now the right time? The CPLP is a certification offered by the ATD Certification Institute for talent development professionals. When you earn the certification, you gain instant credibility among your peers and employers. Earning the CPLP certification can build and validate your skills, increase your earning potential, broaden your career and job opportunities, and connect you with an elite community of more than 2,000 certified professionals. Join this webcast to learn what it takes to become CPLP certified. After attending, you will be able to: – Identify the top three reasons why people pursue CPLP certification. – Name the four major steps in the process. – Decide if CPLP certification is right for you. – Take the next steps and get started!

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Are You Ready to Make a Change? Navigating Your Way to Your Next Position

With the economy and resulting employment opportunities improving, you might be thinking about making a change. Do you want to move up within your organization or change the focus of your position? Perhaps you’re ready to move on to a new employer. Or, maybe you’re thinking about moving from another profession to training and development or instructional design. Join ATD and SkillDirector for a discussion and demonstration about how you can use the ATD Career Navigator to prepare yourself or…

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Lessons Learned

December:
Competency models have been used effectively for multiple HR applications. This alignment focuses HR processes on the factors that matter most. “The model shapes the work we do across our people initiatives, from selection to career planning, and captures the characteristics that are key to success,” says Christine Dolan, senior director of leadership development at the Pepsi Bottling Group.

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Keeping Knowledge Safe and Sound

October:
B&W Pantex maintains a no-nonsense approach to career advancement, and to compliance and safety training. Using innovative knowledge-transfer strategies, the company is well-prepared for future challenges.

This podcast is sponsored by Pfeiffer, an imprint of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Pfeiffer serves the professional development and hands-on resource needs of training and human resource practitioners and gives them products to do their jobs better. They deliver proven ideas and solutions from experts in HR development and HR management, and offer effective and customizable tools to improve workplace performance. Lean more at www.pfeiffer.com.

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CoreSpring – Problem banks & formative assessment tools for K-12 math, English and science

The CoreSpring Learning Suite – The ultimate toolkit. The CoreSpring Learning Suite is a comprehensive, scalable, and perfectly priced formative assessment solution that addresses the present and future needs of any application. It brings together an unparalleled collection of open education resources, our WYSISYG authoring tools, and their powerful technology platform. Content Collections: Designed for and aligned […]

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Sophia – Free crowdsourced tutorial instruction in a range of subjects

Sophia – Welcome to a New World of Learning Their mission is to help students achieve college success with Sophia PathwaysTM, their affordable, flexible, competency-based online courses. These self-paced courses cost a fraction of traditional college courses, and are accessible anytime, from any device. As part of their ongoing commitment to learning, they also provide […]

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