134 Search results

For the term "Organizing".

Selling Sleuth? The Secrets of Gathering Intelligence

Gathering Intelligence – An Insightful Sales Competency Business is an intelligent game and to win you have to gather intelligence about the marketplace. As a Sales Trainer, you will teach the sales team gathering intelligence as a sales competency. Your sales training program will present them how to define, analyze and learn about competitors, products, customers, distributors, industries, technologies and field research. Much of this teaching analysis should integrate and accentuate your sales management curriculum. It will also show how environmental and macroeconomic intelligence data is used to make financial decisions. Talent management and organizational development strategies are also linked to business intelligence when teaching sales strategies. According to Sales Training Drivers, once you acquire intelligence, you can: So, what do you do once you have gathered the intelligence and want to use it in the classroom? Keep your Competition Close In sales, gathering intelligence will be a big asset to assessing prospect problems. First you can isolate the data to come up with qualifying questions that give you answers to pain challenges and budget constraints. Use the data to create a behavioral question interview that will help you keep the prospect engaged in objective conversation to uncover weaknesses that you can solve with your product or service. Now, you are on a real fact finding mission with your prospect! Implement action oriented blended learning tools into your teach back that keeps the class motivated on isolating and organizing the business resources effectively. The best way to keep the class on their heels is to turn the learning function into a real world test role play! Establish ROI with all sales data points Another hard line sales management learning objective would be to use the intelligence to teach the class how to design an ROI analysis report that will sell a Decision Maker. That will always get the class up and moving! Focus on gathering business intelligence that is of interest to the decision makers you are calling on. For example, look at all the companies in your selling market that have had a sales decrease, but could really benefit from your product or service in terms of making or saving money. Why are they experiencing a sales decrease? Formulate a short ROI analysis outline using resourced intelligence to raise an eyebrow based on what you think you can do for that prospect to increase their revenue, productivity and performance.

Self-organized groups and the methods and ethics of accessing learning resources

Jay Cross has posted some further reflections on the Hole in the Wall project that was presented in a keynote speech by Sugata Mitra at Online Educa Berlin two weeks ago. Although the Hole in the Wall has been going for at least 7 years and has been deployed (as Sugata told me privately) extensively not only in various locations within India but also in Africa and Cambodia, confirming the potentially universal application of the results, the deeper findings of the ongoing experiment only came home to me in Berlin, which — incidentally and somewhat ironically — perhaps reveals that public presentations by an active speaker in front of a passive audience may occasionally be an effective way of transmitting knowledge. This post can also be read as my personal answer to the Big Question for December, since the Hole in the Wall (HiW) was indeed the most significant revelation of the year for me. It’s always pleasant to see the experimental confirmation of one’s favorite hypotheses (concerning both social learning and e-learning as a resource), but as with all empirical evidence, I’ve discovered in HiW material for extending the original hypotheses and introducing new dimensions (e.g. the organizational, the psychological and the ethical). It seems to me that the fundamental key to the success of HiW is the notion of “self-organized groups” who learn on their own. If education is to become truly non-invasive, as Jay suggests, it must refrain from defining both the goals and the means to reach them, entrusting the groups with this task. If educational gurus (authorities) notice that a group is neglecting what is considered “essential” in the curriculum (for whatever reason, whether it’s basic security, survival or inculcating an existing set of values), the group could be challenged to account for why they may be neglecting a certain topic or reminded of the interest in pursuing it. Respecting the self-organizing group and its decision-making capacity is the sine qua non of success. It also happens to be the absolute opposite of the organizational principles of traditional education and training. It’s worth reflecting on how learners in self-organized groups use external resources to solve problems. One of Sugata’s anecdotes in Berlin concerned a girl who was overwhelmed by the exposure to the micro-biology courses in English (a language she had to learn as the medium of instruction). She stole some money from her mother to phone her uncle in Delhi, who she hoped might be able to explain in simple terms what DNA was. His vague and unscientific but nevertheless informative answer gave her the minimum she needed to begin constructing her understanding of the lessons she wanted to explore. In other words, everything one already knows or has access to in the world becomes a potential resource for building rather than simply receiving knowledge, traditionally from a single authoritative source. This is probably also the best answer to Andrew Keen – another keynote speaker in Berlin whose stock-in-trade is lamenting Web 2.0’s loss of the sense of established authority common to traditional education and the Web 1.0 — because it demonstrates that even sources of knowledge (the uncle) that are not fully reliable can contribute to the construction and refinement of knowledge. Being exposed to a multiplicity of sources and entering into dialogue with them is the best way of evaluating the components of knowledge and understanding relationships between complementary elements. Inevitably such increasingly complex networks of knowledge (and interpretation of existing knowledge) produce a more diversified intellectual culture capable of appreciating value rather than relying on arbitrary criteria, such as university degrees or media-induced standards of celebrity: see for example this interesting article in the LA Times on the Trump University. I expect that within the family (in Indian culture) the mother could forgive her daughter for the theft. It’s worth noticing that in some cultures – and especially within educational institutions — that theft would not be forgiven and the child would be branded as a real or potential delinquent. It’s the old Jean Valjean problem that our western cultures are still struggling with, where the “rule of law” can easily become a rigid regime of “law and order” and human potential stifled with a vengeance. Sugata told me that his results apply strictly to an age range of 6 to 13. He wouldn’t commit to drawing any conclusions about how the findings might apply to older children and even less to adults. It’s obvious that a similar experimental setting would be difficult to imagine. But I believe that parallels can be found, that the principles concerning the motivational factors of learning are similar and that, with some imagination in the “learning design”, similar results could be produced in adults. The place to begin, of course, is CoPs since what the HiW children effectively did was to build and run their own CoP. And isn’t “self-organized group” the best and most succinct definition of a CoP?

New Study Shows HR Success Is Driving Business Success for 2011

(From marketwire) — Aberdeen Group, a Harte-Hanks Company, has just published a new study exploring the role of HR for organizations in 2011. The report, The 2011 HR Executive’s Agenda: Automation, Innovation, and Growth, was able to create a definitive link between achievement along talent-related measures of success — specifically, higher engagement, deeper bench strength, and improved hiring manager satisfaction — and greater attainment of organizational goals. The top 20% of performers in these key aspects of talent management also achieved greater annual improvement in customer retention and satisfaction by factors of 175% and 83% respectively. Key to these impressive results is the ability to involve the line of business in talent and workforce management activities, as well as the ability to identify roles most critical to the business and plan ahead for those roles. According to Mollie Lombardi, Senior Research Analyst and author of the report, these are positive signs. “Given the recent state of the economy, many in HR have had to take on a more tactical role — doing the blocking and tackling required by reorganizing, or even ramping up for growth. But despite this, more than half of the companies surveyed said that their HR efforts have become increasingly strategic in the past year. We see HR continuing to become a more integral part of the business in the future.” Aberdeen’s report provides more detail into the specific capabilities and technologies that top performers are putting into practice in the coming year, as well as the role of the individual HR executive and the skills that will be needed to fill that role. Complimentary access to this report is available for a limited time due in part by the following underwriters: Taleo, and ELearning!. Read more.

Member Workshops in China

Here’s a blog post from Wei Wang, international relations manager, who recently hosted two member workshops in China: In April, I went to China to organize two ASTD member workshops in Beijing and Shanghai in April. About 120 members and their colleagues participated in the two events. We sincerely thank Siemens Management Institute China and Baosteel Talent Development Institute who kindly sponsored the events. I shared with attendees the presentation “Keep Learning Mission Critical in Tough Economic Times,” which is based on ASTD’s most recent white paper. My favorite quote from the report is: “It’s not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” The participants found the information very interesting. After the workshop, one of the participants emailed me and said, “Just want to say thanks for organizing the seminar in Shanghai. It’s very helpful to get opinions from insiders of the industry. ASTD will be greatly valuable to help the industry to build expertise and make more impact. Looking forward to more presence of ASTD in China.” We are so pleased that our members found the content valuable. During the trip, I also had the opportunity to present ASTD’s latest research and resources for learning and performance professionals at Peking University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, IBM Global Services (China), and several other events. We look forward to working with more organizations to introduce ASTD’s research and resources. It was great to connect with the HRD professionals in China again. We sincerely appreciate the support from our members and partners! Thank you for helping us to build a stronger international learning and performance professional community in China.

Learning to Control our Moods

In Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, author Philip Dick imagined a society where people regularly took drugs to change their mood. The only two pills I personally take are vitamins and the occasional Tylenol. I love my morning coffee, enjoy a dose of chocolate every couple of days, and probably have one alcoholic drink a month, on average. But I realize that I am increasingly using my Ipod (with no music, mind you, just podcasts) as my personal mood regulator. I listen to IT Conversations when I want to build a healthy motivation and “white collar” work level, including driving to a meeting. I listen to political commentary when I want to physically rev myself up, say when doing yard work. And I listen to movie reviews at the end of the day to wind down. I noticed a similar trend in myself when I started organizing Internet bookmarks/favorites by day of the week. Some clicks were better for Monday, and others for Friday or Saturday. I believe this kind of mood awareness/engineering may become increasingly relevant for both deploying personalized learning programs and even planning formal learning events.

Digital Tools / Paper Mindsets

Someone, perhaps unwisely, gave me keys to this blog and asked me to write. We’ll see how long it lasts… For this first post are some long held observations on the use of communications technology. We know and see people spending a majority of their workday, or just walking around town, plus what they do at home, in front of the computer, the cell phone, the blackberry– immersed in digital tools. However, it sure seems we still think in a paper mindset. Think about our terminology. We read web pages. We insert bookmarks to remember pages. Heck, I am surprised we do not refer to web sites as web books. Mainly I am thinking of email, both boon and bane of our workday. Sharing information by email in our organization is the expected norm– and the scourge of spam is bad enough in terms of time and productivity wasters, but also when it is used be well intended people in an inefficient way. The ones that make me scratch my head are messages that arrive with subject lines like “Tuesday Planning Meeting Agenda” and upon opening the message is no agenda, no message, just an attached Word document. This makes the agenda, essentially text only content, yet one more click, and one more application launch away. And what does one really do with a nicely formatted list of basic bullet points? Print it? When I send agendas, they are right there in the body of the email, readily scanned, right there ins the message. One of our groups, actually a technology group, has done this for years. But they’ve recently stepped up the level. They’ve created a portal for online community building. Oi! So the meeting notice is like, this, “Upcoming meeting. Click here for agenda.” I click there. It’s certainly a portal like pile of boxes and links. I find the one labeled meetings. I click the link for this month. It’s another web page. I click a link that is labeled “agenda”. What do I get? It’s the same old Word document. So now the agenda is about 3 clicks and an application launch away. It’s what happens when we are stuck in document – paper – print mindsets. It is all about the “page” and not the content. This was a puny example of a syndrome I have elsewhere labeled email attachment disorder. Beyond Google’s gmail, general e-mail is about the worst and most inefficient system for organizing information. Much of the information shared in our system has no permanence beyond what is stuffed into an email. But there is no long term organizational memory or archiving of email, it is rarely widely searchable, and for large media files, it is sent to many more people than will actually view it. It is a paper mindset, stick a copy in everyone’s mailbox. For as long as I’ve been responsible for our office’s online content, I’ve had to urge, remind, nag to always plan up front that everything we do have some sort of electronic presence, record, etc, especially for those that are unable to participate in our activities. Groups I am responsible for put their agenda up as a URL and filled in later by meeting notes. Our Ocotillo Online Learning Group has held monthly meetings back to 2000, which I know because all meeting notes have been archived, making them potentially searchable and internally linked to relevant content. This is what happens when you think about information in a web mindset, freed from the constraints of single throw away documents. How about the N-factorial e-mail messages needed for N number of people to plan a meeting? For a different tactic, see Lee LeFever’s Common Craft article on Wiki and the Perfect Camping Trip. Now that is using digital tools in a non-paper frame of mind. And it’s been done in real life. This web thinking is playing into our new plans to cease the print publication of a long running journal, which costs our unit thousands of dollars per year plus intense time spent in editing (getting the one off print version perfect), in lieu of a web publication that will, we hope, expand the range and types of content we can publish, plus add features not available in print. We are trying to break of the proverbial box, which is after all… a paper product. So what’s it like in your organization? How does it organization and archive its processes? e.g. is there organizational memory? Are digital communication tools used to push around electronic bits of paper? Or does it really leverage the power of the digital terrain? Are they thinking digitally?

DDI Announces Online Assessment System Manager Ready

Development Dimensions International (DDI) announces the launch of Manager ReadySM, an online frontline leader assessment that combines the efficiency of a technology-driven process with insights of live assessors-leading to a realistic participant experience and in-depth insight into leadership capability and performance. This real world simulation provides organizations with critical information used to make decisions about who is ready for frontline leader roles and how people can develop in those roles to be more effective. Through the use of a computer-based simulation that utilizes streaming audio and video, candidates experience a ‘day-in-the-life’ of a frontline leader and are given the opportunity to respond to problems and inquiries presented through open-ended emails, video voicemails, planning activities and problem-solving exercises. These various data points contribute to a high-quality diagnosis of an individual’s leadership capabilities, giving companies more than 900 participant performance data points that roll up to 9 critical core leadership competencies that determine how a global leader will perform on the job. “Frontline leaders are more critical today than ever. They make the day-to-day decisions that make or break the business,” Scott Erker, Senior Vice President of Selection Solutions at DDI said. “We hear more and more that they’re not ready for the job the organizations needs them to do. Our goal, with this innovation, is to identify the gaps between what skills leaders have-and what skills they need to be successful.” Manager Ready incorporates the high-touch method of extracting real behaviors through simulations and trained assessors scoring those behaviors. In the past, this type of information would require a significant investment-Manager Ready provides high-value diagnosis at a fraction of the cost. Unlike multiple choice tests where participants choose actions from a static list, Manager Ready participants respond in open-ended formats, allowing candidates to reply exactly as they would on the job. The advantage is that it is more realistic to participants and the responses are more reflective of how they handle challenges in the real world. “This data has some teeth, which in an organization like ours is hugely important,” said Tim Toterhi, senior director of global organizational design for Quintiles. “Part of the reason we like Manager Ready is that it gives us robust, fact-based data to help enhance the decision-making process for selecting people-either for promotions or for hiring them into the organization.” Manager Ready participants are scored on how they resolve conflicts with customers and coworkers or how they coach a direct report through a difficult situation. In turn, organizations receive insight into how the candidates perform in these tasks, and measure a participant’s readiness for leadership across nine critical managerial competencies: Coaching for Success, Coaching for Improvement, Managing Relationships, Guiding Interactions, Problem Analysis, Judgment, Delegation & Empowerment, Gaining Commitment, and Planning & Organizing. These competencies were chosen based on more than 700 frontline leader job analysis studies conducted by DDI across the world as well as the millions of leaders trained and assessed by DDI over the last 40 years. “Manager Ready gives organizations deeper insight into the strengths and development needs of their current and future frontline leaders, ensuring better hiring and promotion decisions and improved diagnosis for accelerating development,” Erker said. “The bottom line is that organizations need to find leaders who are ready to take-on the challenges of the new economy.” About DDI Founded in 1970, Development Dimensions International, a global talent management expert, works with organizations worldwide to apply best practices to hiring/promotion, leadership development, performance management and succession management. With 1,000 associates in 42 offices in 26 countries, the firm advises half of the Fortune 500. For more information about DDI visit http://www.ddiworld.com/aboutddi

ASTD 2011 Begins!

The energy in the Orange County Convention Center has been building at a steady pace all morning. It is so great to be in the halls and see people greeting colleagues that they haven’t seen since last year’s conference! So far I’ve met people from the U.S., Korea, China, Denmark, Germany, England, Thailand, Taiwan, The Netherlands, Brazil, Portugal, Mongolia,… I think that’s all, so far! The networking opportunities that the ASTD International Conference & Exposition provide are rich and rewarding. And the learning is awesome! As I type this I’m seeing a steady stream of tweets from people who are sharing what their learning in sessions with Marshall Goldsmith, the MilSpace community, and more. If you’re on Twitter and are interested in the backchannel, be sure to search #ASTD2011 for conference related posts. @BenjaminMcCall – the guy who is organizing the #ASTD Tweetup on Monday night was just in the Press Room (my home for the conference) to pick up his materials. It was like a little mini Tweetup – putting a real person to the Twitter Avatar! Of course today is just a warm-up. Vendors are putting the finishing touches on their booths so they’ll be ready when the EXPO doors open Monday morning. A shout-out to my ASTD colleagues. One of the best parts of the conference, for us, is seeing how much a year’s (or more) worth of hard work pays off in the faces of conference attendees. This is the time of year when it all comes together. The days are long, but the rewards are immeasurable! So Kudos to the ASTD staff and volunteers that make it all possible and make it all happen. And to our ASTD 2011 attendees — Enjoy the learning!

Alert! Your Competition Just Got Your Market Research Data!!

SPANNING BOUNDARIES Warning! Your companies market research data has just been hacked! How did this happen? Some sales guy just “spanned his boundaries!” thus the State of a Free Capitalistic System and that is a GOOD thing!Spanning Boundaries is a Sales Training Drivers World Class Sales Competency. It falls under the category of “business insight” and involves the active collaboration of cross functional teams or work groups. The purpose is to collecting critical information on organizational challenges. Sales training and the need for knowledge management will be invaluable to this process as it relates to team building, prospect data collection, cultural behavior analysis and market trends. Knowledge Management is focused on leveraging different knowledge bases that can provide Sales Trainers up to date resources faster and more efficiently than one leader, group or organization can do by itself. In other words, two or more resources working together towards a common goal is better than one. Wikipedia describes it this way – ” Knowledge management (KM) comprises a range of strategies and practices used in an organization to identify, create, represent, distribute, and enable adoption of insights and experiences.”The incoming information is shared, stored and analyzed by knowledge management so that sales leaders and upper level management can address the business climate and organizational development concerns quickly. Boundary spanning teams and workgroups will continue to collect and bring in the information for problem solving and finding new ways to capitalize on learning and development opportunities. The organizational challenges being examined externally by a cross functional sales and marketing teams could include: business intelligence, global competition, changing marketing demographics, cultural development or technological advances by a competitor. Internal boundary spanning by the team could look at challenges and root weaknesses in executive leadership behavior, succession planning, and an in depth look at interpersonal communication breakdown between senior leaders, departmental directors, and managers. Sales Directors and Sales Trainers will look to give Senior Leaders information on how to solve sales revenue and sustainability problems collectively. This will require the deliberate initiation of highly trained boundary spanning teams.What may be most difficult for Senior Leaders, Talent Management and Marketing / Sales Analysts, is that the re-organizing the traditional vertical organizational charts showing how employees directly report to one another will be changed for open source communication. This is no easy task. It pushes the critical need for knowledge management expertise front and center to measure the success of changing people processes. It will need to ensure the alignment and commitment to a collaborative business strategy. However, it has been found that teams engaged in boundary spanning are more likely to achieve team goals. Just be careful of how you collect and distributeculturally diversity information. Gathering this data and dispersing it into the wrong hands could pose serious organizational concerns. Everyone wants real time business intelligence that is critical to stay competitive.

The Neuroscience of Change

The pace of change today is pushing the limits of even the most nimble organizations. Change occurs in myriad ways, from shifting technology to reorganizing functions to seeking new customers and operating globally.

Course and Lesson Outline Basics

By organizing your training course before you develop the materials, you build a road map for yourself and others working with you to complete the project. You also have a format to explain the structure of the training course to others. Course design that follows the job itself is the strongest path to successful learning transfer. Learn the ROPES method, a systematic and proven way to outline lessons and build courses. Who should attend: New instructional designers and others new to the learning profession will benefit from this course.

Knowledge Management Basics

Knowledge Management Basics will help you to develop a strategic process for capturing, organizing, maintaining, and distributing organizational knowledge.

10 Steps to Successful Strategic Planning

Create a dynamic strategic plan, central to your organizations ability to make critical business decisions, with this step-by-step walk through the strategic planning process. 10 Steps to Successful Strategic Planning offers a simple 10 step process to assessing your priorities, organizing your goals, and getting your organization on the path to planned success. Loaded with worksheets, exercises, tips, tools, checklists, and other easy-to-use and interactive learning aids, this title guides you through the entire strategic planning process.Part of the ASTD 10 Steps series .

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Project Control and Engineering Change Control in ERP

Project control module is used for organizing long term projects such as building a ship or power plant and through Engineering Change Control module, organizations get effective control over engineering change orders.

How Management Functions are Performed at Coca Cola

The four functions of management viz. planning, organizing, leading, and controlling form the foundation and the skeleton on which the organizational processes pivot on. This article is about these functions in the globally recognized leader in the food and beverages industry, Coca-Cola.

Financial Management – Meaning, Objectives and Functions

Financial Management means planning, organizing, directing and controlling the financial activities of the enterprise. It means applying general management principles to financial resources of the enterprise.

Importance of Communication in an Organization

Communication is significant for managers in an organizations so as to perform the basic functions of management, i.e., Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling. Communication helps managers to perform their jobs and responsibilities.

Walkthrough Writing Process

Many students struggle with essay writing because it requires assembling and organizing ideas into a structured form of writing. There is a formula, however

Data Science at Scale – Capstone Project | Coursera

Data Science at Scale – Capstone Project from University of Washington. In the capstone, students will engage on a real world project requiring them to apply skills from the entire data science pipeline: preparing, organizing, and transforming …

Mind Mapping | Ed4Online

A mind map is a free-form way of organizing long lists of information and can be a fun and creative way to show relationships between thoughts and ideas. Simply put, a mind map is a diagram that literally “maps out” your ideas by connecting your thoughts to a central subject.

Overview of Role of Chief Learning Officer

Chief Learning Officers are often found at larger organizations where the human resources department is broken out into various specialties. CLOs, who are sometimes called chief knowledge officers, usually report either to the top talent officer or the chief executive officer (CEO). A CLO’s responsibilities may include on boarding, training courses and materials, employee development initiatives, executive coaching, knowledge management and succession planning. CLOs may also supervise the selection and implementation of learning technology, such as learning management systems (LMS). CLO Job Responsibilities: Develops an organization’s educational process Promotes knowledge management Institutes effective training strategies Directs large scale change management...