Transactional vs Transformational Leadership in Change Management

This article provides a comparative coverage on the role of Transactional Leadership and Transformation Leadership in Organizational Change Management. It further discusses the benefits as well as disadvantages of transformational leadership style and concludes with real business examples where transformational leadership contributed towards bringing a progressive change in the organization and revolutionized the business world.

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Project Transformers

Successful project management involves more than templates, plans and process flows. Projects bring change, which is often resisted by individuals and organizations. Here is one model that can help project managers drive organizational change and improve the likelihood that their projects have a positive, lasting impact.

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PMO 2.0: Resurrecting A Failed PMO

A project management office (PMO) is designed to manage projects and improve the management of an organization. However, what happens when the PMO fails? This article discusses how to resurrect a failed project management office. It reports the results of a study by Forrester Research that shows three-quarters of PMOs fail within the first three years of being launched. It then examines how an aeronautics and space institute in Brazil resurrected its PMO with a unified strategic plan by putting portfolio management and project management into one organizational structure. It details the many reasons why PMOs fail, including lack of direction, organizational changes, insufficient resources and cost pressures. The article looks at how a business case should be developed to convince skeptical senior managers that the PMO should be relaunched and lists the important components needed in the business case, for example, services performed and metrics. It identifies three key areas that can go a long way toward giving the new PMO longevity. Accompanying the article is a sidebar listing three signs that a PMO should be closed.

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Executive Report July 2005

Welcome to ProjectsAtWork’s Executive Report (Vol. 1, No. 7), the newsletter for professionals engaged in high-level, enterprisewide project leadership. In this issue, we recommend best practices for keeping organizational change projects on track … outline a more streamlined approach to generating project proposals … and report on how some project documentation should take into account the possibility of a financial compliance audit. Also: a white paper from the Butler Group and Artemis on the shifting focuses of IT leaders, and tools that can help.

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Beyond Possibilities

Organizational change initiatives require leaders to demystify strategy and translate it into meaningful, daily activities for their teams. In this interview, esteemed HR executive Larry Solomon shares some insights on unlocking the innate ability of people to react, absorb and triumph amid turbulent change.

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Here Comes Microservices

Microservices is an emerging approach to software development that breaks down complex applications into smaller components or processes. It embraces DevOps, complements agile, and can provide better scalability and resilience, among other benefits. But it also requires significant organizational change, and it isn’t a silver bullet; in fact, it can make a mess. Is it for you?

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Changing the Enterprise: The Right Way

Anyone who has been a project manager for a while will have run into an organizational change management project–and has likely experienced some of the unique challenges that they present. We all know that there is no such thing as an easy project, but making fundamental changes to the company or department in which we work presents a whole new set of potential pitfalls. Successful organizational change management needs careful planning and execution–and here we help you prepare for this tricky time.

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How to Better Manage Fixed Bid IT Projects

In fixed bid projects, effective project selection, vendor management, a good contract, organizational change management and project management all play a role in ensuring a positive outcome. In this article, the author discusses how to manage fixed bid IT projects with a focus on the vendor’s perspective. The crucial phases in the lifecycle of a fixed bid project and how to effectively navigate them are examined.

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Walt McFarland Named Chair-Elect of ASTD Board of Directors

Walt McFarland, Founder of Windmill Human Performance, LLC, and former executive at Booz Allen Hamilton, will serve as the 2012 Chair-Elect of the ASTD Board of Directors and will assume the role of Board Chair in 2013. Mr. McFarland created Windmill Human Performance after completing a one year sabbatical during which he studied human and organizational performance, multi-cultural talent management, and organizational change at several institutions and organizations including Oxford and Harvard universities and three Fortune 300 organizations. Prior to taking his sabbatical, Mr. McFarland built a $125 million Human Resource (HR) and Learning consulting business in the federal market for Booz Allen Hamilton. He has consulted for the Internal Revenue Service, Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, Department of Defense, and National Institutes of Health among others. Prior to joining Booz Allen, Mr. McFarland led the HR and Change Management business of Hay Management Consultants where his clients included the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, Marriott, and the Federal Reserve System. He served as an employee of the Federal Government, with his last role as a Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense.

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Sales Competency Base Overview

At the base of the World Class Selling Competency Model Pyramid are (29) competencies in (4) categories. The categories are: Partnering, Insight, Solution, Effectiveness. Let’s break down the framework competencies that builds a world class sales team / organization. PARTNERING: Aligning Customers, Building Relationships, Communicating Effectively, Negotiating, Setting Expectations, Spanning Boundaries. INSIGHT: Analyzing Capacity, Building a Business Case, Evaluating Customer Experiences, Gathering Intelligence, Identifying Options, Prioritizing Stakeholder Needs, Business Context. SOLUTION: Articulating Value, Facilitating Organizational Change, Formalizing Commitment, Leveraging Success, Managing Projects, Resolving Issues. EFFECTIVENESS: Accelerating Learning, Aligning to Sales Processes, Building Business Skill, Embracing Diversity, Executing Plans, Solving Problems, Making Ethical Decisions, Managing Knowledge, Maximizing Personal Time, Using Technology.

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May T+D: Learning’s Earnings: 2008 Salary Survey

ASTD’s learning and performance professionals are well-compensated, earning on average more than $35,000 more than the national average of $48,000. However, as with past ASTD salary surveys, men are earning more than 16 percent more on average than women. The ASTD market research department conducted surveys with more than 590 members in 2008, providing a snapshot of salaries across areas of expertise, job responsibilities, and industry. The top earners reside in larger companies, manage larger budgets, are more experienced, and have significant management responsibilities. Facilitating organizational change and managing the learning function are the top-paying areas of expertise, but human performance improvement and delivering training are increasing in importance and compensation level. As in past years, men are outpacing women in earnings (16 percent more), which is in line with the national average (17 percent). Men make more money than women at every level, with the average for men at $93,377, compared with $79,051 for women. The survey shows that more women are making $100,000 or more, but the men who are making $100,000 or more are making approximately $14,000 more than women on average. Read more in the upcoming May T+D.

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Leaders as Teachers: Six Strategic Benefits

Organizations that effectively utilize a leaders as teachers approach can realize six key strategic benefits. The first reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that it drives business and organizational results by ensuring strategic business alignment between senior business leaders and the programs and services provided by the learning function. A leaders-as-teachers program that is aligned with strategic business and organizational goals serves as a type of organizational insurance policy for leaders who teach. The second reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that it serves as a catalyst for the learning and development of the leaders and associates who participate as students in leader-led programs. This dynamic occurs in three ways: role modeling, creating a safe environment for feedback, and building networks. The third reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that it has inherent development qualities for those who teach. Many leader-teachers say that they are not sure who learns more when they teach.the participants or themselves. They move out of their comfort zone. Job challenges of different types, sizes, shapes, and intensities are the “genetic material” that enables leaders to learn, grow, change, and develop. Teaching, for many leaders, is a very significant job challenge and one that also helps them to see new viewpoints. The fourth reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that leader-teachers have the opportunity to strengthen their organization’s culture and communications. Culture transmission and communications through leader-teachers occurs in numerous ways including role modeling, social networks, communities of practice, continuous learning and communication flow across geographies, businesses and functions. The fifth reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that it enables them to serve as catalysts for business and organizational change through their direct access to a wide range of learners. The sixth and final reason to implement a leaders-as-teachers approach is that it drives numerous cost efficiencies by leveraging top talent. The leaders-as-teachers approach affords opportunities to deliver programs for “pennies on the dollar” compared with many other forms of delivery.

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Guest Post: Smart Moves: Capitalize on Trigger Events and Careful Timing to Win More Sales

Note: This is a guest post from Michael Boyette from the Top Dog Sales Blog. Want to contribute your own guest post? Let us know! Trigger events are the silver bullets in sales, because they allow you to get in front of the right person at exactly the right time. Sales coach and author Craig Elias points to three types of trigger events. Each trigger signals a high probability that the company will eventually purchase new goods and services. Trigger #1: Executive moves Executives are typically hired to make a difference. And since top executive tenure tends to be short, they want to make their mark fast. They need to buy solutions and services in order to make that happen. And they need something new, because if the old stuff was working they wouldn’t be there. It’s also easier for new management to change suppliers. They can say that a previous vendor was a poor choice made by someone before them. Trigger #2: New funding Studies show that companies with new funding are up to eight times more likely to buy services than comparable companies that haven’t had a similar funding event. Funding is meant to drive growth, which means purchasing new solutions and services to help with sales, marketing, product development, operations, and so forth. It’s not just that they’re flush. Many times management is under pressure to spend new money quickly to show investors they’re doing everything possible to succeed. Trigger #3: Launches New products create demand for supporting products and services that fuel sales growth for the new product, such as marketing services, sales training, and e-commerce. New products often spawn the departure of personnel and other changes as people move on to newer projects. Product launches therefore create secondary trigger events, such as new funding and executive changes. Hitting the Trifecta Corporate acquisitions, by their very nature, involve changes in executive roles, which often ripple throughout the entire organization. They also involve changes in funding, with some groups doing better under the new regime and some doing worse. Like any other major organizational change, a merger creates multiple trigger events, each of which can be leveraged into a sales opportunity. How to Capitalize Use something as simple as Google Alerts to search for product launches or LinkedIn to follow changes in executive staffing. One Sales 2.0 application for this purpose is iSell, from OneSource, which informs you of the trigger event, and also provides context, such as information about the industry and the prospect’s competitors. The application provides you with enough information to have a relevant conversation the first time you talk to the prospect in response to the trigger. Michael Boyette is the managing editor of Selling Essentials newsletter and editor of the Top Sales Dog blog (http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/top-sales-dog). He’s also managed marketing/PR programs for DuPont, Tyco Electronics, and US Healthcare, among others. In addition, he’s authored ten books on a variety of subjects for such publishers as Simon & Schuster, Dutton and Holt. Contact Michael via email at topsalesdog@rapidlearninginstitute.com.

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Companies Utilizing Virtual Teams to Reduce Costs, Manage Productivity in Economic Downturn

(From PRNewswire) — A research survey conducted by consulting firm Chronos Consulting has found that more companies in the U.S. and worldwide are utilizing virtual teams to reduce costs, enhance productivity and attract wider talent pools in today’s volatile economic and political environment. Companies headquartered in the United States and Canada, and from industries such as financial services, oil & gas, telecom, cable, call center operations, consulting and transportation, responded to the survey. This cross-industry research survey identifies the top 8 benefits to organizations by using virtual teams as well as the challenges in utilizing them and provides compelling insight and practical recommendations to senior managers tasked with managing human resources and organizational change. It focused primarily on the HR function, but also included the operations and information technology functions at their points of intersection with HR, particularly when utilizing virtual teams. “Our survey was designed to identify the challenges, trends and opportunities provided by virtual teams for cross-industry organizations in North America, especially when dealing with organizational and human resource restructuring,” said Imaad Mahfooz, Managing Principal of Chronos Consulting. “Our goal is to use these results to answer questions like how the virtual team model should be applied to business and what are the top benefits of deploying these teams.”

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Supporting Social Learning for the 21st Century (SU418)

Social learning is how people learn today, through their colleagues, social media, and technology. Learning and development professionals need to help employees connect with other people and information within and across organizations, so they stay engaged and keep up with industry, job, and organizational changes. This session will introduce the concept of social learning and the skills for becoming a social learner. You will interact with social learning activities, and will see a demo of a…

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Managing Training Projects

Good project management skills are needed for the launch of any learning initiative designed to support organizational change. This issue presents a project management process that will enable you to manage training projects, from conception to evaluation, successfully using the familiar ADDIE (analyze, design, develop, implement, and evaluate) model of instructional systems development. Samples of project schedules, estimates, and budgets will help you get organized quickly, while the job aid will help you identify the key resource needs.

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The Power of Variance Analysis

By using variance analysis to identify areas of concern, management has another tool to monitor project and organizational health. People reviewing the variances should focus on the important exceptions so management can become aware of changes in the organization and the environment. Without this information, management risks blindly proceeding down an uncertain path.

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Low-Hanging Fruit

Most major organizational initiatives require visible, unambiguous, short-term wins to persuade skeptics and marginalize cynics. Strategic change leaders need to identify the low-risk actions within the larger effort that will have the widest impact, and then publicize the results. Here are helpful tips and real-world examples.

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Topic Teasers Vol. 83: Does This Metric Make Me Look Fat?

Question: Ah, the dreaded new boss! This organization works through other vendors to deliver our international training services. My team reviews them for longevity, education and certification of instructors, stability of organizational structure, quality and content of their materials, publicity and webpage honesty, and similar traits found in a high-value partner. The new boss has no background or understanding of our industry or training in general, and immediately wants to impose strict metrics to evaluate my team and me. This doesn’t seem like a good idea. Am I missing something?

A. Metrics or concrete, short-term data about the performance of each person working for an organization are crucial to make sure that team members are not slacking off and occupying a position someone else could use to bring the company more value.

B. The new boss is trying to make his or her mark by introducing the new metrics to have something concrete to show. These statistics will prove to not be a good idea over time, so let the organization figure it out for itself. Collecting them is the equivalent of the lion’s roar to mark this territory to all within earshot.

C. Only people who are fearful of what the data will show will object to having it collected, formed into charts and submitted to management. In fact, since you know what is being gathered you can change your daily performance to be sure you look good in these new metrics regardless of whether or not it is the best use of your time.

D. An organization should look at the need for and value received from any metrics gathered and used. Unless they are collecting data that is meaningful and will lead to better results, they are a waste of company time and resources, may be misleading and may be discouraging for the team.

Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

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Executive Report August 2005

Welcome to ProjectsAtWork’s Executive Report (Vol. 1, No. 8), the newsletter for professionals engaged in high-level, enterprisewide project leadership. In this issue, we explore the key findings from an organizational project management study, including the link between process maturity and project results … outline a 10-step approach to developing meaningful project performance measures … and offer tips for monitoring and measuring the impact of your change initiatives. Also: a case study from MKS on a major bank’s push to standardization.

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False Pretenses

Aeronautical engineers don’t try to “fix” gravity; sailors don’t try to change the wind’s direction. But many project managers expend much of their energy trying and failing to remedy universal features of organizational life, when they could more usefully adapt to their eternal presence.

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Legal Project Management Grows Up

In this time of great change in the legal industry, firms with mature Legal Project Management (LPM) systems will enjoy a competitive advantage. This article examines LPM development from both the individual and organizational levels and looks to the history of and current trends in project management in an attempt to define some of the characteristics of LPM maturity.

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Pick Your Battles

Sometimes you have to demonstrate a better way of doing things before change becomes possible. But just how unorthodox an approach to managing projects is acceptable? Well, it might depend on how unorthodox the challenges are. And no real change is going to take hold unless there is strong organizational acceptance.

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Getting Control of IT

While a variety of approaches to portfolio management have been documented, most require significant enterprise change, investment and risk. Here is an implementation approach that can bypass many of the major cultural, technical and organizational challenges that typically add risk, cost and complexity.

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Capture Value Through Agility

A new report from Project Management Institute highlights six foundational practices for establishing an Agile culture, including rapid response to opportunities, shorter review-decision cycles, elimination of organizational silos, alignment of capabilities to strategy, a focus on change management, and integration of the customer’s voice.

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Hotel Opening Processes in Greater China: An Analysis of the Problems and Issues

With China’s tourism and hotel industries booming, the bulk of hotel openings will be achieved through new built projects. This phenomenal growth requires international hotel management companies to completely rethink the way they open new properties in China. The authors argue that well-proven project management approaches are the best ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of opening hotels in China going forward; however, this will necessitate a significant organizational cultural change.

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Successfully Managing Federal Rightsizing Initiatives

Federal managers can anticipate mission changes, organizational restructuring, and austere budgets in fiscal year 2013 and beyond. The challenge will be to incorporate these into headquarters-mandated mission changes while creating and maintaining high-performing subordinate teams. The most successful managers will understand headquarters’ reality and be prepared to participate in decision making. They must provide well-reasoned alternatives aligned to established metrics and program assessment criteria.

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David Cooperrider

An interview with David Cooperrider, Professor of Social Entrepreneurship, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University; and Chairman and Founder, Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit. Cooperrider is best known for his theory and practice of appreciative inquiry as it relates to corporate strategy, change leadership, and positive organizational scholarship.

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Click

The Challenge-Learn-Innovate-Change-Know (CLICK) model has been designed to aid workplace learning professionals in developing knowledge workers and supporting personal and organizational transformation – one challenge at a time. Employee innovation is a very pertinent challenge in the workplace today. Most w…

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Workflow learning vs. the “me-focus” culture

The idea of workflow learning is surprisingly controversial. I attended the “Innovations in E-learning” symposium last week, put together by George Mason University, the US Naval Education and Training Command, and the Defence Acquisition University. I was interested in hearing what Jay Cross, Clark Aldrich, Harvey Singh and Ben Watson had to say about workflow learning, collaboration, and simulations, since these are things I have always been passionate about. Jay’s presentation, as usual, was delightfully challenging, non-linear, evocative, and provocative. But the presentation on “embedded learning” by Michael Littlejohn of IBM astonished me. He provided a well-structured overview of the practical deployment issues of embedded learning. My surprise was not so much at what he said, but that it was being said by IBM. If Big Blue is advocating it, then workflow learning has come a long way, baby. I did a piece on this on my own blog, and have already had a lot of back-channel skeptical feedback. In all that I have read about workflow learning, I have yet to hear anyone argue that it is not a great idea conceptually, but there are a whole lot of people who can’t believe workflow learning will ever work in practice. They are blinded by their culture. It reminds me of the mid-to-late 1990s when I was promoting online learning to a resistant training community, who could not believe that anyone would prefer a computer to a classroom, or that any online learning could be as effective as that delivered by a trainer. Many were also desperately afraid of having to re-invent themselves. At the time, my mantra was “it’s warmer on the web,” because I was trying to get through to trainers that online learning was all about connecting people, building communities, mutual mentoring, and sharing experience. To a largely techno-skeptical audience numbed by the self-indulgent atrocities of CD-ROM courses, online learning was never going to fly. The key that unlocked the e-learning Pandora’s box, unleashing a few gems within a cloud of pestilence, was a culture shift. Corporations started taking for granted ubiquitous desktop computing and internet connections, and started looking to leverage them to improve business processes and cut costs. Trainers started to get as myopically starry-eyed about e-learning as they had about PowerPoint. Workers started to appreciate the need to keep themselves current, valuable, and marketable because it became clear that companies were not going to provide more than the basic essentials. Training vendors saw a need to defend against more tech-savvy competitors, as well as an opportunity to broaden markets and raise margins. Quite a lot of learners had a few good e-learning experiences, mind-sets started shifting from resistance to acceptance, if not enthusiasm, and e-learning was airborne. Workflow learning requires similar, though probably more dramatic, organizational and personal culture changes. A major prerequisite for workflow learning is a culture that fosters collaboration and sharing, that rewards (rather than punishes) individual support initiatives, that builds a fundamental responsibility for informal coaching and mentoring into every employee’s job description, and that places as much value on time spent helping others perform as it does on time spent performing. Another prerequisite is a widespread personal attitude toward supporting others that values highly the giving of both time and knowledge – two things most workers jealously protect. It’s not about the technology or the processes (though of course they are important), because without the individual will and the corporate mandate, the technology will gather dust. To change corporate culture, you need to demonstrate to senior decision-makers how much money can be made or saved (preferably this quarter) as a result of the proposed change. If they buy into the financial reward, corporations can move mountains. But how do you formalize, in a way that bean-counters will accept, the ROI from something as apparently fuzzy and informal as workflow learning? IBM advocates thinking small and running a pilot. That may be a starting point, but it’s not a strategy. Do you need to get conceptual buy-in at CEO level and have a bold shake-up, top-down, in order to achieve any sustainable culture shift? Or do you abdicate and wait for a bottom-up worker-driven evolution that effectively bypasses formal learning systems? However you do it, without a culture shift away from the “me-focus” that most organizational review/reward systems instill, and toward a “we-focus,” workflow learning just ain’t going to fly! Godfrey Parkin

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The New Hierarchy: First, learning to BE; second, learning to DO; and only then, learning to KNOW

I had a high school teacher who observed that the male students seemed to spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to be male students, and the female students seemed to spend a lot of time trying figure out how to get male students. As I work with companies implementing both social networking and simulation technology, I have observed a new hierarchy of needs. 1. Learning to Be People strive to know who they are. What do they like to do, and what do they hate to do? With whom are they most comfortable, or motivated, or depressed? Who are their role models? How can they get satisfaction and sustainability out of life? What are their priorities? What is a good day and what is a bad day? Where do they fall on the issues of the day? Is it better to be directive or participative? As people figure this out, they want to test this new personality out on the world. They make comments online, and post pictures. They speak up at meetings. They give suggestions and then orders of their co-workers, friends, and subordinates. They strive understanding and validation. To a large degree, this has been the drive of much of social networking and web 2.0, as well as pop culture, and “Cosmo” and Match.com self-tests. People today strive for self definition increasingly globally, not just defining themselves by where they live, where they work, or as a friend or enemy of the next door neighbor. 2. Learning to Do People then want to have a impact on the flow of their world – to change the course of activity in a positive way because of what they do. This is where the big skills, such as leadership, stewardship, project management, and innovation come in. This is where people put forth some blood, sweat, and tears, and experience ownership This is where simulations play a critical role. Immersive learning simulations, especially practiceware, have the ability to give people ten years of distilled experience in 15 hours. Sims develop an awareness of the all-critical “active knoweldge” trinity of: 3. Learning to Know At this point comes the learning to know. This might be cultural literacy/history, or organizational history, or trivia. This is where we try to make sense of the world we inherited – to piece together the giant puzzle. This is where books and the History Channel become so interesting. It is around this third category that academics has built both their curricula and their research process, one of the reasons I have so little hope for the role of Ph.d dominated Foundations to add significantly to the first two. I say again that what we teach is limited by what we can teach. The exciting thing about this new media order is that we have more power at our fingertips for development than ever before.

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Strategic Workplace Learning in the Public Sector

Strategic Workplace Learning in the Public Sector A little less than two years ago on this blog, I entered a curmudgeonly post on “The Non-Strategic State of Workplace Learning” (See Agile Bureaucracy, June 16, 2008 – http://community.thepublicmanager.org/cs/blogs/agile_bureaucracy/archive/2008/06/16/the-non-strategic-state-of-workplace.aspx ). My snarky premise was that even though since the mid-90s government at all levels had begun requiring strategic goals, measurable outcomes and periodic reporting on results, “this shift (hadn’t) yet made a noticeable dent” in aligning training and development investments with agency mission or management priorities. For example, I noted, “In a post-silo organizational culture, Chief Human Capital Officers (CHCOs) would be fully involved in the organization’s strategic planning and management systems (and such T&D) activities would be (integrated) to meet priority challenges.” Designing Strategic Leaning Efforts I also speculated that indicators of this integration might appropriately include the training community’s involvement in designing learning efforts to: foster an organization-wide performance culture improve oversight and accountability behavior recruit, engage and retain young professionals – among other priority HR challenges help IT professionals and non-technologists alike keep pace with expanding E-expectations help managers transcend boundaries of federal, state and local governments and foster collaboration among public, private, and nonprofit sectors assure that transparency becomes an organization-wide value help agency managers plan to share responsibility for achieving results – with other governmental levels, internationally and the private sector prepare managers for and respond more collaboratively to catastrophic disasters Again, the unflattering picture I painted two years ago didn’t include much evidence that the T&D community even had a seat at the table on these matters. To be sure, some of the feedback (and blowback) I received suggested that I had painted too bleak a picture. (After all, even the Dutch Masters included a few swatches of thick, white oil paint on their invariably dark canvases.) Nevertheless, few colleagues – trainers, HR leaders, and other public management professionals – could point to instances where training figured as an integral part of strategic public sector initiatives. Strategic Workplace Learning Observed Well, in searching for such illuminating examples, I’m beginning to see some light. In fact, the theme of the summer 2010 issue of The Public Manager is strategic workplace learning – with likely articles featuring case illustrations from such government organizations as: the US Departments of Defense, Energy, Homeland Security, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Transportation, and Veterans Affairs; and New York State, among others. Moreover, many of these public sector workplace learning innovations will be presented in interactive or workshop-style sessions at the American Society for Training and Development’s (ASTD’s) 2010 International Conference & Exposition to be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 16-19 ( http://www.astdconference.org/ ). Here are brief highlights from just two of these training efforts – both involving the US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA): Enabling Success in Afghanistan: Building Cultural Expertise at the US Department of Defense As the United States geared up to send thousands of troops into Afghanistan, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) faced the challenge of preparing hundreds of intelligence analysts to enter the country knowing something of the history, culture, politics, and governance of the region. The Afghanistan-Pakistan Regional Expertise Training Program was developed to deliver cultural expertise training to intelligence professionals and operations personnel across the Intelligence Community and US Department of Defense. This case study considers how the DIA responded to a time-critical, far-reaching problem that crossed agency and coalition lines. It examines how to meet the need for an immediate solution while addressing questions of funding, format, location, and ideal content – in effect, how to create and evaluate a sustainable model for preparing employees to operate in a range of countries and cultures. Creating a Collaborative Culture at the Defense Intelligence Agency After the terrorist attacks of September 2001, the members of the Intelligence Community (IC) needed to transform from a stove-piped culture, where employees viewed knowledge as power, to a collaborative culture, where employees saw knowledge sharing as their personal responsibility. Creating such a culture begins with an effective onboarding program. In 2004, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) leadership directed the development of an orientation and acculturation program to bring together all junior-level, professional-grade employees, regardless of job responsibilities. The 5-week program develops an understanding of how all elements of the DIA work together to support US National Security objectives and Department of Defense operations, and to collaborate with other Intelligence Community (IC) members. This program is innovative among IC onboarding courses by its attendance policy, the length of the course, the curriculum, and the instructional methodology. DIA recognized that new employees could be effective change agents and designed its onboarding program to help establish a knowledge sharing culture. The recitation examines training techniques DIA has used to foster a culture of collaboration across organizational lines, explores the challenges within organizations that inhibit collaboration, and identifies the role of senior leadership in transforming the culture and the onboarding process. Share Your Observations In subsequent posts, I’ll be sharing more examples of how government organizations are aligning training efforts with strategic agency goals. If you know of other examples of how public sector organizations have begun to align workplace learning efforts with priority mission and management challenges, please let me hear from you. Better still, encourage trainers and managers in these organizations to comment on this blog directly and weigh in with their own best practice T&D stories. I’ll make sure to share these examples with a larger audience.

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Our Next Complimentary Webcast: Selling with Brand Power

How Will You Give Your Sales Force the Competitive Advantage in a Knowledge-Based Selling Environment??? Wednesday, February 22nd at 1:00pm E.T. Success in the future will go to those salespeople who are positioned in the minds of their customers as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and solution providers — and who are an active, visible presence in the marketplace. As a sales or training leader responsible for optimizing sales performance, your role will likelytransition from skill-builder and product-trainer to “brander”, where you will help your salespeople design and implement strategies that leverage their insight, capabilities, knowledge, client successes and more. Join David Topus and team members Diane Crompton and Jennifer Eggers of the TOPUS organizationfor the one hour webinar “Selling with Brand Power” as they lay out what may very well be the last frontier of branding — a future where salespeople themselves are a central part of the company’s value proposition, and differentiation comes from how well they are positioned, packaged and promoted to customers. Learn… 1. What dynamics are causing this shift from skills and product knowledge to personal brand as differentiator 2. What a well-branded salesperson looks like 3. How social media presents new opportunities to achieve competitive differentiation 4.What tools are available for raising salespeople’s visibility and credibilityin the eyes of customers 5. The cultural and organizational considerations in building a well branded sales force 6. What this means for you as sales or training leader, and how you can turn this evolving opportunity into a game-changer for your sales team David is a nationally-recognized consultant, trainer and soon-to-be-published author who has been helping companies and individuals communicate their value propositions more effectively. Since 1990 he has worked with hundreds of companies and thousands of salespeople across dozens of industries in sales messaging and readiness. He wrote and produced the Victory! sales training curriculum used by Fortune 1000 companies around the world, and was the founding general manager of ExecuNet’s personal marketing services group. HIs first book, “Talk to Strangers; How Your Everyday Random Encounters Can Expand Your Business, Career, Income and Life”, is due out in April from John Wiley and Sons. As he so aptly describes it, he “takes the mess out of people’s messaging and put the art in their articulation”. Register for the webcast here: https://astdevents.webex.com/astdevents/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=598653884

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New York State Office of the State Comptroller Redefines Standard of Business Analysis Excellence

Background The New York State Office of the State Comptroller (NYSOSC) in Albany maintains a broad scope of responsibility unmatched by similar offices in the United States. As the state’s chief fiscal and accounting officer, the Comptroller is a separately elected state-wide official whose primary duties include managing and investing the State’s cash assets, auditing government operations, paying all NYS employees, reviewing State contracts, overseeing the fiscal affairs of local governments including New York City, and operating two of the state’s retirement systems. As an agency charged with monitoring the effective financial operation of numerous other agencies and entities, the NYSOSC understands the need to carefully maintain its own project management (PM) and business analysis (BA) capabilities. Therefore, the Office engages in regular self-assessment and performance improvement in these areas. The ChallengeNYSOSC has built a reputation for continually advancing project management best practices through its PM Center of Excellence (CoE). However, realizing that enhanced business analysis practices can also increase project success and user support, as well as heighten customer satisfaction, the agency has sought, since 2006, to improve its business analysis practices by instituting a Business Analysis Center of Excellence (BACoE). NYSOSC performance improvement programs had primarily benefited PM teams prior, and support had not been available for the advancement of BA teams. By promoting BA competencies, knowledge management, enterprise analysis skills and practices similarly to the PM program, NYSOSC sought to achieve comparable, positive results. Strategic PlanningThe agency’s cross-division Business Analysis Work Group completed a strategic report in 2006 presenting the benefits of advancing NYSOSC’s use of business analysis and making next-step recommendations, including the launch of a BACoE. In 2007, the second phase of the project was launched to begin to develop and support business analysis as an organizational resource. Kevin Belden, Deputy Comptroller and CIO, and Kirk Schanzenbach, Director of the Program Management Office (PgMO), were executive sponsors; and Barbara Ash, Assistant Director for BA in the PgMO, was the project manager. The project team consisted of numerous representatives from BA units across the agency. To provide counsel on industry best practices, and to resolve issues that were impeding progress, the project team enlisted the help of ESI International. “Having worked with ESI in the past to build our project management and business skills capabilities,” said Schanzenbach, “we were confident that they were the best partner in achieving our BA goals.” ESI began by working with NYSOSC leadership and the project team to outline unifying objectives for BA and PM skills areas, including the need to: The Solution In cooperation with ESI, NYSOSC determined the key strategies to ensure a successful program. Foremost among these were: To support the program launch, ESI designed and delivered a two-day, project kick-off workshop that centered on the program’s four-part learning framework and targeted development of knowledge, skills, ability and attitude. Day one introduced the program to senior management and focused on developing best practices in alignment with BACoE operating standards. Executive activities included competitive, interactive group exercises that helped to define and prioritize goals around developing the BACoE. Day two introduced the program to front line business analysts and ensured a common understanding of BA concepts and executive directives. Following the kick-off, the team worked in subcommittees on project deliverables, received best practice advice, and exercised skills and competencies through coaching exercises. Special attention was also given to evaluating and treating such problematic areas as standards and methodologies topics for the BA group. “This intensive learning experience was very well received as a serious enhancement to the traditional instructor-led effort.” said Ash. “Participants also felt that it accelerated the program launch significantly compared to previous programs.” Toward Change In the early months of the program, ESI participated in regular group meetings and calls in order to provide coaching and to reinforce goals and specific training targets. While ESI continues to deliver essential counsel, the NYSOSC has quickly achieved the competency to offer coaching and mentoring using internal resources. Other significant program accomplishments and benefits to date include: Championed by executive sponsors Belden and Schanzenbach and project manager Ash, the internal team continues to recommend and oversee BA learning programs and progress, as well as support the advancement of BA maturity.

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New Research Reveals That Candidates Seek More Employment-Related Content On Companies’ Social Media Sites

(From PRWEB) — Bernard Hodes Group, a leading provider of integrated talent solutions, released the results of a new research study focused on the utilization of social media networks by companies interested in sourcing and recruiting new talent. The study, entitled “The Employment Conversation: How Employers & Talent are Meeting on the Social Web,” additionally reveals how the online population utilizes social media for seeking career-related information. Among the most interesting findings is that only one-third (32%) of those surveyed and searching social media sites found an employer presence containing helpful job-related information. “Our research supports the importance of a social media presence from a recruiting and branding standpoint,” said Alan Schwartz, president and CEO, Bernard Hodes Group. “Companies must be committed to nurturing their social web presence and ensure that they are connecting with potential candidates in an honest and authentic manner.” According to human resources professionals who participated in the Hodes study, the biggest challenges to deploying social strategies for recruiting purposes are managing internal training and resources needed for implementation, convincing co-workers or superiors that it is a worthwhile endeavor, funding, and organizational reluctance to change. Read more.

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Multiple choice or Multiple strategies

This week in a delightful discussion group called Business Creativity (an international but essentially Indian Yahoo group focused on Human Resources), the moderator challenged the list with a multiple choice question in the form of a human resource case study problem (essentially, whether or not to grant paid leave to Don, an employee seeking to further his education on company time). This provoked some interesting feedback, but most of the contributors stayed strictly within the implicit reasoning of the initial choices. I saw this discussion as an opportunity to review some of our classic pedagogic strategies and made the following reply, highlighting some points about formal and informal learning as well as CoPs: I see this exercise as a first phase of creative thinking, and this for three reasons. In other words, questions like this can be a springboard for creativity so long as we accept to think outside of the box and even aim precisely for that by pushing the cases further and, if need be, to their breaking point. Two of the techniques we use in training where an activity starts with a multiple choice are: 1. to use it to brainstorm on ANY and ALL kinds of similar cases within the experience of the group of learners, who then must account for as many elements of context as possible (including, for example, personality issues, social networks, etc.), all of which allows us to discover the importance of these “social reality” issues. In other words, the learners fill in the missing context from the initial case by relating it to real, known contexts. This actually helps, on another level, to build group and individual confidence and to create the reflex of relating what would otherwise be considered as “canned wisdom” to their own very real human context. 2. to go back through a deconstruction phase and find out why each of the initial choices was proposed (i.e. what kind of reasoning lies behind them — including the good reasons that lie behind faulty choices — but also, what was the didactic strategy of the author of the question! – a process which often makes people think on a different and highly stimulating level). These are processes that work well within a group of learners in a seminar but aren’t easy to apply in an online discussion group, where the level of mutual knowledge and personal trust is impossible to assess. They also work well in CoPs (Communities of Practice), which is the major theme I’m now working on, in conjunction with informal learning. As a case in point of the deep compatibility between formal and informal learning, multiple choice questions — the simplest of teaching tools — are highly formal but can provide occasions for lively informal learning. We maintain, of course, that in all configurations people learn mostly from informal exchange, but — as Jay Cross, the leading light on the subject, insists — that formal learning can be structured in such a way as to encourage it. Unfortunately, that still rarely happens. At the end of the day, my answer to Don (in my own context, not the abstract one proposed in the question) would be to throw two questions back to him: what do you need to learn and what are you expecting to learn from the course you want to enrol in? I wouldn’t try to dissuade him from taking the course (and discussing how that fits in to his work schedule), but I would try to better understand what his goals are and how they correlate with mine (i.e. the organization’s). I would use the knowledge gained from this exchange to understand in what form what he needs to know professionally exists (or fails to exist) in our real work context. I would then look at ways in which three separate things can happen: This would probably lead to the definition of one or more CoPs, as well as the integration of Don into one of them. Of course, everything I’ve said above focuses only on the learning side of the problem, which certainly wasn’t the initial intent of the question. But I hope this serves as a demonstration of how something as formal as a Multiple Choice Question built around a specific learning point (in this case, how to manage work time in relation to personal and organizational goals) can stimulate creative contributions. That works, of course, only if the trainer’s attitude is also creative. Unfortunately, many trainers are still thinking in terms of pre-established “teaching points” and fail to recognize what I would call “lateral wisdom”. There’s increasing reason, however, to believe the old school is losing ground and new approaches to learning — first as a complex personal, social and professional goal, then as a process — are truly emerging. The process has always been put first, but the priority of goals is finally being recognized, at least in some quarters. And that should lead to some unexpected new conclusions.

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Korn/Ferry International Named HR Consulting Firm of the Year at China Staff Awards 2010

(From PRNewswire) — Korn/Ferry International, a premier global provider of talent management solutions, has won the HR Consulting Firm of the Year award in the category of Talent Management at the recent China Staff Awards 2010. Organized by CCH, a Wolters Kluwer business, the China Staff Awards, established in 1998, recognizes individuals and companies whose dedication to the HR profession is acknowledged by their peers. “We are thrilled to win the award for HR Consulting Firm of the Year under the Talent Management category,” said Jack Lim, managing director of Korn/Ferry’s Leadership and Talent Consulting business in Greater China. “The award is a testament and recognition of the work we do with our clients to help them continually build their capabilities and talent pipeline, in order to remain agile in a fast changing environment.” In recognizing Korn/Ferry, the panel of judges noted that “Korn/Ferry’s research-based talent management solutions have come at a critical time in the China market and worldwide. We recognize them for their quality services in the areas of identifying best fit talent, leadership assessment, and customized development programs. Korn/Ferry leverages unique methodologies to attract, identify and develop high-potential leaders who learn quickly, navigate change and drive the changes needed in the market.” The HR Consulting Firm of the Year award recognizes the firm that offers cohesive and effective HR management solutions in areas such as HR Strategy, cost & budget, organizational development, leadership development, succession planning, HR technology and workforce planning. These solutions must not have only helped clients create a high-performance work environment, but also proved to result in measurable benefits to the client company. Previous winners of this award include Hewitt Associates Consulting and Mercer Human Resources Consulting. Read more.

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Is your Training Effective after 90 days?

In an article posted by Achieve Global in 2008 entitled “Does Training Rely Too Much on Coaching by Managers? it isdiscussed that “training and coaching needs to be long-term companions in developing employees.” Sales Training Drivers is in agreement here and it is centered on the Sales Training Drivers core mission. 1. Integrate Sales Management with Talent Management 2. Create a Dynamic Sales Learning Culture 3. Increase Revenue and Maximize Sales Performance The question of whether sales training is effective after the employee receives it – is an emotional debate on its’ own. Coaching, Training and Managerial Effectiveness has had to change for the better in the Workplace over the past few years to respond to employee conflicts, and behavioral dysfunction between employees and managers. Unclear long term employee action planning is also a detriment to specific business results. Many trainers still do not understand how to tie specific business objectives to individual employee training to determine the impact of organizational revenue and performance productivity. Employee turn-over is the most costly of this mis-managed metric. And, if the Trainer does understand how to deliver at this level, is there enough time, a budget, resources and open communication with management to address such concerns? Sales Training Drivers will be discussing the evolution of this human performance improvement challenge in more detail in up coming blogs. Stay tuned for a lively conversation. We will take a look at the history of training and the different aspects of how it impacts HPI. (Human Performance Improvement).

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In the New Economy, Deviance in the Workplace Can Spur Innovation

(Tampa, FL) — In the workplace, do you consider yourself a constructive deviant, a destructive deviant, a little of both, or none of the above? According to research by a University of Tampa professor, some of the most valuable individuals in an organization are both constructive and destructive deviants. In a presentation at the Academy of Management Conference in early August, Bella Galperin, an associate professor of management, argued that deviance — defined as voluntary behavior that violates organizational norms and can threaten the well-being of an organization — can be constructive and functional for organizations, and employees who fail to follow the organizational norms can be the roots of successful innovations and champions of change. “Employees who break the rules and cause harm to the organization are also your organization’s potential change agents. They will break the rules to increase the well-bring of your organization,” Galperin said. Currently, organizations have focused their efforts on identifying and reducing destructive deviants — potentially aggressive and dishonest employees. The costs associated with dysfunctional behavior in the workplace have been estimated in the billions. Read the full release.

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Increase Business Capacity to Increase Sales

Analyzing Organizational Capacity Analyzing Capacity within a business organization can be one of the most challenging of the sales training foundational competencies. The reason is because a positive cash flow from sales revenue generated by a high performance sales force ensures that the company can afford to risk making strategic market decisions. It needs to be able to service and deliver quality products that can be sold to grow the business. What is the function of Business Capacity? Business capacity involves analyzing, monitoring, measuring, evaluating, managing, and planning all functions of the company for financial, statistical, and behavioral data. This process allows business leaders to clearly identify how to grow and sustain the health of the organization. This includes: technological, operational and human performance. You can perform activities that align and maximize capacity measurements and improvements within any part of the organization. According to the ASTD World Class Selling, the definition of “Analyzing Organizational Capacity is to: “Assess and weigh competing requirements against available resources to minimize risk, ensure quality deliverables, and balance capabilities with capacity.” Key actions would include: 1. Assessing resources accurately 2. Balancing risk with goal achievement when determining next steps Should I integrate the capacity of my SALES or TRAINING department? Absolutely! It is extremely valuable for you to understand the financial, operational and human requirements and costs to run your training department. As a Sales or Talent Management Sales Trainer, you are responsible for the knowledge management of the sales team and its’ performance outcomes. The health of your own training department is vulnerable to business capacity shifts and changes. The better you understand how analyzing capacity works the better your departmental efforts will be measured for your own success as a Trainer! How does this relate to Sales Training? Your sales team’s performance in any given month will reflect the increases or decreases in the “capacity” to which the organization can utilize internal or external resources. In this case, we are talking about the companies’ ability to access financial resources that come from new and existing sales revenue. Sales revenue is the anchor of life for all business, The company will suffer in capacity when a sales organization is not strong. The business must be able to “afford” to adapt constant change and if it cannot do that without strong sales leadership, revenue increase and consistent sales productivity. If the organization be able to adapt to capacity changes or sustainability is threatened.

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Book Launch! Get a Free Chapter

A Sales Management Guide to the New World of Selling As sales organizations scramble to create a sustained competitive advantage, the very nature of selling continues to change. If you lead a sales team and are in search of a better way to implement your sales process, stop guessing and use World Class Selling: New Sales Competencies as your foundation for driving sales results. Based on data-driven criteria from thousands of sales managers, sales trainers, and salespeople, this publication identifies the absolute necessities for building a world-class sales team. Remove the uncertainty from your sales strategy today and put people and other resources in perfect alignment with your organizational sales goals. Get a free chapter of this groundbreaking work by filling out the form below. To protect your privacy, once you enter your details, you will be asked to confirm your email address.

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Bombardier: Giving women wings

(From The Globe and Mail) — Bombardier Aerospace is one of the world’s largest producers of civil aircraft, with nearly 17,000 full-time employees in Canada. But its areas of engineering and manufacturing traditionally haven’t attracted many women. The company is out to change that. “We’ve broadened our strategy to increase diversity, with having more women throughout the organization as a top priority,” says Elisabeth Buss, director of leadership development and talent management at the Dorval, Que.-based organization, a division of Montreal’s Bombardier Inc. “Increasing diversity is a business strategy: We want our employees to be representative of the community in which we do business.” Women have made up two-thirds of the recent growth in the Canadian workforce, climbing from 35 per cent in the 1970s to 50 per cent in 2005, according to the book Organizational Behavior: Managing People and Organizations. Following its inaugural two-day Women in Leadership Forum in Montreal in 2010, Bombardier Aerospace set a goal to increase the percentage of women in management positions from the current 16 per cent to 25 per cent by next year. Read more.

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ASTD Press releases new book that promises excellence in internal consulting!

“I don’t get no respect” could be a catchphrase for an internal consultant-but not anymore. A few days ago, ASTD Press published Consulting on the Inside, 2nd edition, and once internal consultants get their hands on this book and start applying its lessons, they will get respect in spades. How are internal consultants different from externals? Well, let’s look at external consultants first. The external consultant-often perceived as having a lot of expertise, experience, and credibility-is brought in by senior executives to “facilitate a client-requested change without having the formal authority to implement the recommended actions.” He or she is often viewed as an objective outsider, someone who has a lot of broad business experience and knows all the latest and greatest business thinking. Often he or she is viewed as a hotshot who is trusted by the executive team to fix an organizational problem. Internals, however, sometimes seem to lack credibility and aren’t taken seriously. They can be viewed as having an agenda, as not being objective. Also, they lack the broad business exposure that external consultants gain as part of their everyday work. However, internal consultants do some advantages externals don’t have: They have deep knowledge of the organization-its culture, its lingo, its history, the ways things are done-which can give them an edge in getting projects off the ground because they know who to talk to and how to make things happen. In Consulting on the Inside, 2nd edition, Beverly Scott and B. Kim Barnes provide all that an internal consultant could need to leverage their advantages and minimize their disadvantages. The book provides an eight-phase consulting model that allows for the often nonlinear and iterative nature of the internal consulting process. One of the new additions to this second addition is a section devoted entirely to the interpersonal skills that are required for success in internal consulting (and in business in general). The skills that B. Kim Barnes brings her considerable experience and in-depth knowledge to include influence, negotiation, innovation, change, and team effectiveness. And finally one the real values of the book are the tools provided both in the hard copy and on the web. These include meeting agendas, self-assessments, processes, models, flowcharts, and more. So read the sample chapter at the Consulting on the Inside webpage, pick up a copy, and get some respect!

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ASTD Presents 21 Excellence in Practice Awards

During its 2010 International Conference & Exposition held here, the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) presented the Excellence in Practice Awards and Citations to 38 organizations from eight countries: England, Hong Kong, India, Philippines, Taiwan, The Netherlands, Turkey, and the United States. The Excellence in Practice Awards program recognizes organizations for results achieved through learning and performance practices and solutions. From 131 submissions, 21 awards and 38 citations were given in nine categories: career development, diversity and inclusion, learning technologies, managing change, organizational learning, performance improvement, training management, technical training, and workplace learning and development. “The winning organizations advance the knowledge and strategic importance of the training and development profession,” notes Tony Bingham, ASTD President and CEO. “The accomplishments demonstrate how the alignment of learning to organizational goals and strategies increases the performance and success of organizations worldwide.” The Excellence in Practice Awards are presented to those organizations with proven practices that have delivered measurable results in achieving organizational goals. The organizations and their partners selected to receive Excellence in Practice Awards are: The Excellence in Practice Citations are presented to those organizations with practices that have shown that they will demonstrate measurable results. The organizations and their partners selected to receive Citations are:

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ASTD Archive Image of the Day: Team Leadership, Circa 1991

This image appeared in the October 1991 issue of Training & Development magazine. The article compared an orchestra conductor to a manager of the self-directed work team. According to article authors John H. Zenger, Ed Musselwhite, Kathleen Hurson, and Craig Perrin, “What’s called for now is a different kind of manager–more strategic, more collaborative, more faciliatitve, and more responsive to customers, employees, and organizational imperatives.” Sound familiar? The more things change the more they stay the same. Do you have a manager training program in place? What are the critical competencies that managers need to succeed in today’s workplace? For more information about T+D magazine, visit www.astd.org/td.

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April T+D: Learning in a Down Economy

(By Andrew Paradise and Jennifer Mosley) Every learning professional knows that the struggling global economy has caused considerable distress in the past year. Organizations have been forced to find ways to cut costs, with more pressure than ever. Have learning functions been targets or have they developed ways to adapt? In fact, many organizations are now looking to the learning function for solutions when they face difficult economic conditions. This finding was confirmed in a new study by ASTD and the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) that examined how organizations manage learning in a down economy. Specifically, the “Organizational Learning in Tough Economic Times” study looks at budget reductions, process improvements, effectiveness of the learning function, efficiency changes, and other lessons learned in reaction to market downturns. The study found that organizational leaders realize that increased pressure from the economy can actually create a need for learning. The processes and focus of corporate learning may change as leaders navigate through difficult conditions, but if the specific goals for learning programs are in place and the drivers for reorganization or adjustment of content are clear, organizations can still rely heavily on learning. However, respondents to the study’s survey cited many pressures on learning, with some activities, such as leadership development, in most critical need during a recession.

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Alert! Your Competition Just Got Your Market Research Data!!

SPANNING BOUNDARIES Warning! Your companies market research data has just been hacked! How did this happen? Some sales guy just “spanned his boundaries!” thus the State of a Free Capitalistic System and that is a GOOD thing!Spanning Boundaries is a Sales Training Drivers World Class Sales Competency. It falls under the category of “business insight” and involves the active collaboration of cross functional teams or work groups. The purpose is to collecting critical information on organizational challenges. Sales training and the need for knowledge management will be invaluable to this process as it relates to team building, prospect data collection, cultural behavior analysis and market trends. Knowledge Management is focused on leveraging different knowledge bases that can provide Sales Trainers up to date resources faster and more efficiently than one leader, group or organization can do by itself. In other words, two or more resources working together towards a common goal is better than one. Wikipedia describes it this way – ” Knowledge management (KM) comprises a range of strategies and practices used in an organization to identify, create, represent, distribute, and enable adoption of insights and experiences.”The incoming information is shared, stored and analyzed by knowledge management so that sales leaders and upper level management can address the business climate and organizational development concerns quickly. Boundary spanning teams and workgroups will continue to collect and bring in the information for problem solving and finding new ways to capitalize on learning and development opportunities. The organizational challenges being examined externally by a cross functional sales and marketing teams could include: business intelligence, global competition, changing marketing demographics, cultural development or technological advances by a competitor. Internal boundary spanning by the team could look at challenges and root weaknesses in executive leadership behavior, succession planning, and an in depth look at interpersonal communication breakdown between senior leaders, departmental directors, and managers. Sales Directors and Sales Trainers will look to give Senior Leaders information on how to solve sales revenue and sustainability problems collectively. This will require the deliberate initiation of highly trained boundary spanning teams.What may be most difficult for Senior Leaders, Talent Management and Marketing / Sales Analysts, is that the re-organizing the traditional vertical organizational charts showing how employees directly report to one another will be changed for open source communication. This is no easy task. It pushes the critical need for knowledge management expertise front and center to measure the success of changing people processes. It will need to ensure the alignment and commitment to a collaborative business strategy. However, it has been found that teams engaged in boundary spanning are more likely to achieve team goals. Just be careful of how you collect and distributeculturally diversity information. Gathering this data and dispersing it into the wrong hands could pose serious organizational concerns. Everyone wants real time business intelligence that is critical to stay competitive.

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The Neuroscience of Creating High Performance Cultures

‘Culture’ is a hot topic in organizations, but what is culture? And, how does one change culture? This session will share new research about how to measure and change a key aspect of an effective company culture: Trust. It is based on 10 years of neuroscience research in the laboratory and in businesses. If leaders do not manage culture, it will manage them. This session presents organizational research data that establishes a link between the trust hormone oxytocin and team and organizational…

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Moving from Training to Performance

Are you being asked to change to a performance-based focus at your company? Are you interested in moving into a performance consulting role but not sure where to start? Do you want to be more informed when people discuss performance improvement methods? In this webcast, Joe Willmore, expert performance consultant and author of ATD’s Performance Basics, will share his insights and then answer your questions in a more informal discussion of the topic; when you register for the webcast, be sure to submit your question for discussion. During this webcast, you will learn: – basic principles of a performance-based approach to consulting – how performance consulting differs from training, organizational development, and process improvement – what has changed in the field of performance improvement – steps to take to build your performance improvement skills.

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Employee Engagement Through L&D

Learn how MGM Resorts provides development and educational opportunities at every level of leadership. MGM Resort’s vice president of talent and organizational leadership will share the company’s development strategy, which is rooted in the company’s core values. MGM’s development strategy is designed to drive engagement and behavior changes that correlate to the rise in guest service that the company has recently experienced. During this webcast, you will learn how to: -Leverage outside the…

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Appreciative Inquiry

Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a form of organizational analysis and development based on understanding what currently works well and then building on strengths to make an even better organization. This Infoline describes principles of AI, including using positive language and storytelling to cause change; the 4-D model of discovery, dream, design, and destiny; and the HPI-AI model, which enables workplace learning and performance professionals to apply AI in the context of performance. The issue also provides general tips for using AI, a sample appreciative interview, and other helpful tools and information.

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The 2005 ASTD Team & Organization Development Sourcebook

The 2005 edition of the ASTD Team and Organization Development Sourcebook draws on the knowledge and expertise 46 top-flight consultants, team developers, and training facilitators. The book presents a comprehensive toolkit of the most important topics facing organizations today, including managing change, launching organizational initiatives, facilitating teams, goal setting and planning, creative problem solving, building cooperation and trust, and team development. The 40 games, exercises, learning activities, assessment instruments, handouts, tip sheets, and implementation guides are all field-tested and available for use on the accompanying CD-ROM to enable you to implement the most up-to-date training programs for your clients quickly and efficiently.

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Organization Development Basics

A primer on the broad field of organization development (OD) and a foundation for understanding of the tools, practices, and core skills of the OD practitioner. Organizational Development Basics will help trainers, training managers, and beginning OD practitioners learn the fundamentals of influencing organizational strategy and direction. Learn the basics for managing change and aligning people, processes, and practices for success.

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Overview of Role of Chief Learning Officer

Chief Learning Officers are often found at larger organizations where the human resources department is broken out into various specialties. CLOs, who are sometimes called chief knowledge officers, usually report either to the top talent officer or the chief executive officer (CEO). A CLO’s responsibilities may include on boarding, training courses and materials, employee development […]

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