34 Search results

For the term "Sustainable Development".

The Age of Sustainable Development | Coursera

The Age of Sustainable Development from Columbia University. The Age of Sustainable Development” gives students an understanding of the key challenges and pathways to sustainable development – that is, economic development that is also socially …

Ecosystem Services: a Method for Sustainable Development | Coursera

Ecosystem Services: a Method for Sustainable Development from University of Geneva. Ecosystem services are a way of thinking about – and evaluating – the goods and services provided by nature that contribute to the well-being of humans. This …

Leadership Development for Sustainable Growth

In this session the speakers you will hear about Deniz Academy’s success story of adding value to business goals with integrated talent management processes, using examples of onboarding programs, leadership development programs, and others.

New SDI Leadership Development Experience with Dr. Michael Maccoby

Carlsbad, CA – January 25, 2011 – Leadership is a relationship-one that exists in a context. Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence is a new program from Personal Strengths Publishing that focuses on the skills and qualities leaders need to be effective-no matter the context. This leadership development experience for senior leaders (and those who aspire to these positions) is the result of collaboration between world-renown leadership expert Dr. Michael Maccoby and Tim Scudder, President of Personal Strengths Publishing. At the heart of this program is Strategic Intelligence, the distillation of decades of Michael Maccoby’s research and practical experience as a consultant to many of the world’s largest organizations. He identified the things that leaders do to affect sustainable change in organizations. This course condenses and communicates that wisdom while the integration of SDI helps to carry that wisdom into the relationships between leaders and followers. The synergy between the concepts of Strategic Intelligence and Relationship Awareness are rooted in a common foundation; Dr. Maccoby has written or co-authored 13 books including one with Erich Fromm, whose work was a major influence on Elias H. Porter and his development of Relationship Awareness Theory. “Integrating the SDI and other works of Elias Porter into Michael Maccoby’s powerful leadership concepts has been a peak experience for me personally,” said Tim Scudder. “The integration of ideas was facilitated by the discovery of a remarkable common heritage.” Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence takes a systems view of developing the leadership capabilities of leadership teams. Leaders are challenged to clarify and communicate their philosophy of leadership-and of life. The course explores the fundamental relationship of the motives of leaders and followers, the four R’s of motivation and how they are colored by different Motivational Value Systems, and many more important leadership concepts. “This is the best leadership course by far,” said Betsy Chittenden, U.S. National Park Service. “And I think I’ve taken at least one course from every management trend over the last 20 years.” Michael Maccoby will deliver the keynote address at the upcoming Relationship Awareness Conference in Carlsbad, CA. Tim Scudder will present a special workshop at the ISPI (International Society for Performance Improvement) conference in April of this year. A pre-print of a related article can be downloaded at http://www.leadersweneed.com/links.html Learn more. Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence Free Informational Webinar February 28, 2011 For more information go to: www.leadersweneed.com Or call 760-602-0086

Designing Sustainable Behavior Change: 7 Key Recipes From 500+ Companies and 100,000 Employees (SU107)

More than 80 percent of learning and development (L&D) initiatives that try to create new employee routines fail after just 30 days, costing more than $1 trillion in lost productivity, or $7,000 per employee, every year. This cost is growing more than 15 percent per year, outpacing the profit of many companies. Left unaddressed, few will survive this silent killer. According to McKinsey & Co. the biggest bang for the buck in behavior change is in facilitating habit formation. Although only…

Building Resilient Learning Organizations: 7 Practices for Creating Sustainable Value (M307)

Building a high-performing, integrated learning organization is never easy. Sustaining one is even harder, especially in a new ‘normal’ of volatile, complex, and ambiguous times. Yet the learning function needs to remain stable, relevant, and resilient in the face of up and down cycles of budget cuts and reorganizations if it is to deliver its full potential for driving talent development, high performance, and innovation. In this session, you’ll learn seven proven practices that will help your…

Political Economy of Institutions and Development | Coursera

Political Economy of Institutions and Development from Universiteit Leiden. This course is part of the SDG initiative addressing the UN Sustainable Development Goals, specifically for the following SDGs [1, 8, 10 …

Greening the Economy: Sustainable Cities | Coursera

Greening the Economy: Sustainable Cities from Lund University. How can we shape urban development towards sustainable and prosperous futures? This course will explore sustainable cities as engines for greening the economy. We place cities in the …

Global Environmental Management | Coursera

Global Environmental Management from Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Learn about the best environmental technologies for a sustainable development and how they are managed in various settings around the world. This course gives you an …

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Talent Reviews and Succession Planning Matter More During Tough Economic Times

In the current economy, some companies are choosing to maintain their highly targeted leadership development programs to retain their best talent. But in an era where the media highlights charismatic leaders such as Steve Jobs and Larry Ellison, JDS Uniphase has chosen to build broader and more sustainable leadership w…

One to Watch: Wasuthorn Harnnapachewin

As a senior consultant for one of the top three coaching firms in Thailand, Harnnapachewin has been involved in more than 150 human resource development projects. Her experience working with clients from a wide range of industries has given her unique insights into the talent development field. She is passionate about helping businesses achieve sustainable growth through more effective people development.

Why is a Mobile Learning Strategy Important?

With mobile learning getting a lot of interest recently (roughly 50% of businesses surveyed say they have plans to implement some form of mobile learning in the foreseeable future), it’s becoming clear that many companies don’t have a plan to successfully create a sustainable, robust mobile learning strategy. This is evidenced by the quick jump from talking about goals and roadmaps to the proverbial “We need an app for that!” conclusion that is being reached in meetings and boardrooms across all industries and company sizes. This rush to deploy without proper planning is a big oversight and will ultimately make it difficult to understand if your mobile efforts are successful. A mobile learning strategy can help give your work grounding and a solid base on which you can build. This approach helps you bring mobile in where it will provide the biggest impact. A metered, reusable framework is far more useful than a scattershot approach. When apps are pumped out and then discarded it’s often because they didn’t perform as expected. These apps likely don’t fix the problems that were considered but not dealt with fully during the design phase. Perhaps the app shouldn’t have been built at all. Maybe its focus should have been narrower, or altogether different than what it turned out to be. A mobile learning strategy’s importance is not only limited to savings during the design and development of the applications that may be created. Real, actionable metrics can only be established for individual efforts when the bigger picture is considered. What will you measure? How will you know when you are successful? What sorts of changes are you able to and prepared to make when you start to get data back from your learners? The creation of a strategy will allow outside stakeholders to help weigh in on your anticipated mobile learning efforts to come, giving your work a much needed validation. The strategy’s strengths will help build support throughout your organization, creating trust between your partnering departments and content creators allowing them to create great work. The concerns that could arise about the focus of the efforts or how it fits in with or aligns with other work will already have been addressed. This proactive approach works with other facets of business planning, why would mobile learning be any different? Over the next few weeks, we’ll investigate topics related to this, covering the building blocks for a mobile learning strategy, the effects of creating one, what happens when you neglect to create one, and then finally how to get started on implementing your completed strategy. Come back and check out our next installment.

Strategic Workplace Learning in the Public Sector

Strategic Workplace Learning in the Public Sector A little less than two years ago on this blog, I entered a curmudgeonly post on “The Non-Strategic State of Workplace Learning” (See Agile Bureaucracy, June 16, 2008 – http://community.thepublicmanager.org/cs/blogs/agile_bureaucracy/archive/2008/06/16/the-non-strategic-state-of-workplace.aspx ). My snarky premise was that even though since the mid-90s government at all levels had begun requiring strategic goals, measurable outcomes and periodic reporting on results, “this shift (hadn’t) yet made a noticeable dent” in aligning training and development investments with agency mission or management priorities. For example, I noted, “In a post-silo organizational culture, Chief Human Capital Officers (CHCOs) would be fully involved in the organization’s strategic planning and management systems (and such T&D) activities would be (integrated) to meet priority challenges.” Designing Strategic Leaning Efforts I also speculated that indicators of this integration might appropriately include the training community’s involvement in designing learning efforts to: foster an organization-wide performance culture improve oversight and accountability behavior recruit, engage and retain young professionals – among other priority HR challenges help IT professionals and non-technologists alike keep pace with expanding E-expectations help managers transcend boundaries of federal, state and local governments and foster collaboration among public, private, and nonprofit sectors assure that transparency becomes an organization-wide value help agency managers plan to share responsibility for achieving results – with other governmental levels, internationally and the private sector prepare managers for and respond more collaboratively to catastrophic disasters Again, the unflattering picture I painted two years ago didn’t include much evidence that the T&D community even had a seat at the table on these matters. To be sure, some of the feedback (and blowback) I received suggested that I had painted too bleak a picture. (After all, even the Dutch Masters included a few swatches of thick, white oil paint on their invariably dark canvases.) Nevertheless, few colleagues – trainers, HR leaders, and other public management professionals – could point to instances where training figured as an integral part of strategic public sector initiatives. Strategic Workplace Learning Observed Well, in searching for such illuminating examples, I’m beginning to see some light. In fact, the theme of the summer 2010 issue of The Public Manager is strategic workplace learning – with likely articles featuring case illustrations from such government organizations as: the US Departments of Defense, Energy, Homeland Security, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Transportation, and Veterans Affairs; and New York State, among others. Moreover, many of these public sector workplace learning innovations will be presented in interactive or workshop-style sessions at the American Society for Training and Development’s (ASTD’s) 2010 International Conference & Exposition to be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 16-19 ( http://www.astdconference.org/ ). Here are brief highlights from just two of these training efforts – both involving the US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA): Enabling Success in Afghanistan: Building Cultural Expertise at the US Department of Defense As the United States geared up to send thousands of troops into Afghanistan, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) faced the challenge of preparing hundreds of intelligence analysts to enter the country knowing something of the history, culture, politics, and governance of the region. The Afghanistan-Pakistan Regional Expertise Training Program was developed to deliver cultural expertise training to intelligence professionals and operations personnel across the Intelligence Community and US Department of Defense. This case study considers how the DIA responded to a time-critical, far-reaching problem that crossed agency and coalition lines. It examines how to meet the need for an immediate solution while addressing questions of funding, format, location, and ideal content – in effect, how to create and evaluate a sustainable model for preparing employees to operate in a range of countries and cultures. Creating a Collaborative Culture at the Defense Intelligence Agency After the terrorist attacks of September 2001, the members of the Intelligence Community (IC) needed to transform from a stove-piped culture, where employees viewed knowledge as power, to a collaborative culture, where employees saw knowledge sharing as their personal responsibility. Creating such a culture begins with an effective onboarding program. In 2004, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) leadership directed the development of an orientation and acculturation program to bring together all junior-level, professional-grade employees, regardless of job responsibilities. The 5-week program develops an understanding of how all elements of the DIA work together to support US National Security objectives and Department of Defense operations, and to collaborate with other Intelligence Community (IC) members. This program is innovative among IC onboarding courses by its attendance policy, the length of the course, the curriculum, and the instructional methodology. DIA recognized that new employees could be effective change agents and designed its onboarding program to help establish a knowledge sharing culture. The recitation examines training techniques DIA has used to foster a culture of collaboration across organizational lines, explores the challenges within organizations that inhibit collaboration, and identifies the role of senior leadership in transforming the culture and the onboarding process. Share Your Observations In subsequent posts, I’ll be sharing more examples of how government organizations are aligning training efforts with strategic agency goals. If you know of other examples of how public sector organizations have begun to align workplace learning efforts with priority mission and management challenges, please let me hear from you. Better still, encourage trainers and managers in these organizations to comment on this blog directly and weigh in with their own best practice T&D stories. I’ll make sure to share these examples with a larger audience.

South Africa tackles skills shortage

(From southafrica.info) South Africa could not afford to have an economy “constrained by a severe lack of skills”, Higher Education Minister Blade Nzimande said at the launch of the country’s third National Skills Development Strategy. While the first and second strategies had achieved much since the inception of the Skills Development Act of 1998, a severe skills lack was constraining the economy, Nzimande said in Midrand, Johannesburg on Thursday. The third National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS III) was aimed at improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the country’s skills development system. “This strategy represents an explicit commitment to encouraging the linking of skills development to career paths, career development and promoting sustainable employment and in-work progression,” Nzimande said. “The emphasis is particularly on those who do not have relevant technical skills or adequate reading, writing and numeracy skills to enable them to access employment.” Read more.

New Survey from Krauthammer: Around 80% of businesses feel resistant to current difficult business climate

KRAUTHAMMER | London, UK 80% of international businesses feel relatively resistant when it comes to the worsening business climate. 55% will defend their investments in ‘behavioural development’ programmes in areas such as leadership, management and sales. On the downside, 20% say that they will cut their budgets. This and other findings are the results of a probe conducted by Krauthammer in late Autumn 2008. 34% of the respondents forecast a poor business climate for 2009. Around 20% believe they have “low resistance” to a difficult business climate and are planning to cut their behavioural development budgets in line with their predictions. However, over twice as many – 55% – feel resistant – and 42% even plan to raise development budgets. “The news is mixed. The most positive signal we can distill from our probe is that companies will prioritise initiatives with a real and measurable impact. So consultants that excel in sophisticated forms of body-shopping will probably be hit as hard as temporary personnel providers”, comments Ronald Meijers, Co-chairman of the Board of Krauthammer. *) body shopping typically implies filling temporary competence gaps rather than structurally improving a company’s performance. The respondents will defend training and coaching more vigorously than they will consulting. And as many CEOs admit their difficulties in predicting results for 2009, leadership training will be most defended – by 53% of respondents, followed by sales training (47%) and management training (42%). Crossfunctional training such as IT- and language skills will be least defended, the probe suggests. When it comes to coaching, too – leadership, management and sales coaching will be most defended. Overall, training seems less vulnerable than coaching – training will be cut by fewer numbers of people than its coaching equivalents. According to the probe, consulting budgets will be defended by around a third of businesses. Least popular, the probe suggests, will be consulting in “hard issues” such as strategies, operations and structures – only 19% of the respondents would defend it. A combination of “soft” and “hard” issues such as sales effectiveness will be most resilient of consulting propositions – 33% of respondents say they will protect budgets in this area. Nick Girling Senior Consultant, Office Leader UK, Krauthammer Tel: +44 20 8770 7200 Mobile: +44 7900 5648 79 E-mail: nick.girling@krauthammer.com Coaching, consulting and training company Krauthammer assists clients worldwide in successfully uniting permanent people development and sustainable business performance. It offers major change implementation and human capital development programmes at the individual, team and corporate levels optimising the personal effectiveness of leaders and managers, salespeople and negotiators, trainers, coaches, consultants and support staff. Established in 1971, Krauthammer International has 300 consultants and employees, delivering services in over 50 countries, in 15 languages. International consistency and the ongoing professional development of the consultants are ensured by four annual Krauthammer University sessions where every consultant spends between 2 and 3 weeks per year. www.krauthammer.com

New eBook from Richardson

A lot has been said recently about the changing behaviors of buyers. No longer are companies able to control the flow of information to buyers thus the typical linear sales process has been thrown out the door. Without this linear process, salespeople are unable to control the pace and rhythm of the sales cycle. During the summer I wrote about Agility Selling – “a new paradigm that applies the latest research and the scientific principles of chaos theory to the challenges facing today’s sales professionals”. As a follow up to that, I’d like to introduce you to a new eBook from Richardson, The Roadmap to Scalable and Sustainable Sales Transformation, which provides some case studies from companies that tackled this new buying decision reality by taking on “ambitious sales transformation initiatives” in areas like sales readiness, sales development, and ongoing sustainment of the behavioral and process changes. As the introduction points out, prospective customers are designing solutions and making some decisions before your company is even contacted. Additionally, the emergence of procurement teams has created a decision by committee atmosphere. Both of these factors give a salesperson very little time to make their case so they must be prepared to demonstrate value to any member of the procurement team at a moment’s notice. As trainers we must prepare them to adapt to the buyer’s buying cycle and present value in terms the various members of the buying team understand. Richardson’s latest eBook offers 3 case studies highlighting the dramatic steps taken by 3 companies to meet these challenges by preparing their sales teams through proper training and development. I hope you take some time to check it out!

Dubai: Human resources conference attracts more than 30 world’s best speakers in strategy and expertise

(From Zawya.com) — The International Human Resources Conference and Exhibition (IHRC 2011), hosted by the Federal Authority for Government Human Resources (FAHR), will bring more than 30 world’s best known thought leaders and innovators in human resource development and organisational reforms to the UAE. The conference and exhibition, to be held in Dubai from Jan. 19 to 20, will set the stage for a global exchange of knowledge and ideas on integrating efficient HR management into the strategic plans and policies of governments and organisations across the world. Over 300 HR practitioners, heads of states, and experts are expected to attend IHRC 2011, held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President and Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai. Speakers at the conference will analyse regional and international trends and challenges in education, job creation and talent management, linking the debates to the central theme of the conference, “Human Resources: the Sustainable Capital for the New Era.” The conference has already attracted academics, strategists, trainers and consultants from world-leading centres of excellence in knowledge, innovations, leadership and management and from trend-setting public and private sector organisations worldwide. Read more.

Strategic Intent

At Agilent Technologies, creating a sustainable competitive advantage drives learning and development.