PM Candidates, Personality Tests

Many companies are incorporating personality assessments into the hiring process to gauge cultural fit, leadership potential and other elusive factors. Here an organizational development expert discusses the value of these tests, a tip for weeding out unreliable ones, and a 10-point checklist (plus three questions) that can help identify promising project managers and team members.

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New SDI Leadership Development Experience with Dr. Michael Maccoby

Carlsbad, CA – January 25, 2011 – Leadership is a relationship-one that exists in a context. Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence is a new program from Personal Strengths Publishing that focuses on the skills and qualities leaders need to be effective-no matter the context. This leadership development experience for senior leaders (and those who aspire to these positions) is the result of collaboration between world-renown leadership expert Dr. Michael Maccoby and Tim Scudder, President of Personal Strengths Publishing. At the heart of this program is Strategic Intelligence, the distillation of decades of Michael Maccoby’s research and practical experience as a consultant to many of the world’s largest organizations. He identified the things that leaders do to affect sustainable change in organizations. This course condenses and communicates that wisdom while the integration of SDI helps to carry that wisdom into the relationships between leaders and followers. The synergy between the concepts of Strategic Intelligence and Relationship Awareness are rooted in a common foundation; Dr. Maccoby has written or co-authored 13 books including one with Erich Fromm, whose work was a major influence on Elias H. Porter and his development of Relationship Awareness Theory. “Integrating the SDI and other works of Elias Porter into Michael Maccoby’s powerful leadership concepts has been a peak experience for me personally,” said Tim Scudder. “The integration of ideas was facilitated by the discovery of a remarkable common heritage.” Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence takes a systems view of developing the leadership capabilities of leadership teams. Leaders are challenged to clarify and communicate their philosophy of leadership-and of life. The course explores the fundamental relationship of the motives of leaders and followers, the four R’s of motivation and how they are colored by different Motivational Value Systems, and many more important leadership concepts. “This is the best leadership course by far,” said Betsy Chittenden, U.S. National Park Service. “And I think I’ve taken at least one course from every management trend over the last 20 years.” Michael Maccoby will deliver the keynote address at the upcoming Relationship Awareness Conference in Carlsbad, CA. Tim Scudder will present a special workshop at the ISPI (International Society for Performance Improvement) conference in April of this year. A pre-print of a related article can be downloaded at http://www.leadersweneed.com/links.html Learn more. Becoming a Leader We Need with Strategic Intelligence Free Informational Webinar February 28, 2011 For more information go to: www.leadersweneed.com Or call 760-602-0086

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EDGE: Weekly Training & Development, From Bloomberg Businessweek

(From BusinessWeek.com) Across the globe, two significant workforce trends are colliding to create a critical need for leadership development training over the next 5 – 10 years. A new generation of skilled workers are entering the labor market in droves – many without previous work experience – while a large group of seasoned leaders are approaching retirement (estimates show that employed individuals between the ages of 55 and 64 will increase by 11 million in the U.S. alone by 2010). In the midst of this growing leadership gap, market conditions are making the need for innovative and strategic leaders more critical than ever. How can companies continue to engage, retain and develop high-potential employees when resources are more constrained than ever? Given the current pace of change in business, how can companies put leadership development in context of what’s happening now? The answer: through agile leadership development programs and on-the-job training programs such as Bloomberg Businessweek’s EDGE. EDGE combines the world-class, insightful content found only in Bloomberg Businessweek with a cutting-edge, weekly training guide incorporating interactive and self-assessment learning activities. EDGE synthesizes headlines, news and trends impacting global business and extracts key learning concepts that can be incorporated in leadership development. Our future forward content is developed each week in real-time so that participants are learning about the impact of business decisions as they happen. EDGE is available to corporations to increase their bench-strength and grow their high-potential leaders. Bloomberg Businessweek’s Executive Development Guide & Extract (EDGE) is an innovative leadership development program that can increase your company’s bench-strength and develop your high-potentials. Written by leadership development experts, EDGE offers your employees robust, continuous learning opportunities – giving them a broader business perspective, igniting their thinking and stimulating collaboration. New content each week makes EDGE flexible and scalable – you can use it however learning happens within your organization. EDGE can be integrated into existing programs or used as a foundation to create new ones: * Formal leadership development programs. * Lunch and learn / One hour power hour – Organize “Lunch and Learn” or “Power Hour” training sessions on a regular basis. * Mentoring program – Incorporate key learning’s into networking, mentoring or coaching sessions. * Informal training sessions – Facilitate informal training sessions with peers or direct reports to share articles, EDGE extracts, etc. Bloomberg Businessweek’s EDGE includes: * A one-year subscription to Bloomberg Businessweek for each participant. * One year of the Executive Development Guide & Extract (EDGE) – e-mailed weekly including unique activities and key learning points designed around six articles in the current issue of Bloomberg Businessweek focusing on executive competency areas such as: * Leadership & Management Skills * Strategic Thinking * Personal Skills * Best Practices/Lessons Learned * Global/Technology Trends * Business/Financial Acumen To learn more about integrating EDGE into your corporate learning programs, contact us at: bwgroup@bloomberg.net

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Do You Brag About Your Personal Learning Network?

One of the best things about being an instructional designer right now is that now more than ever we feel that our field is in the zeitgeist of what’s happening in the media and technology worlds. What we do (rather, how we do it) is influenced greatly by technologies that support more flexible means of communication and collaboration. Social media and mobile technologies have turned the spotlight on social learning concepts, which in turn have made more of us think about the large, ill-charted dark matter of culture: informal learning. Of course, our response to this turn of events should be elation – finally, Charles Jennings can stop talking about 70-20-10! We can explain communities of practice without once using the phrase “well, no, that’s not really an example of what i’m talking about…”! (bonus: we can avoid awkward tittering by wholly avoiding the name ‘Wenger’ in a classroom setting). Everyone in the Internet Time Alliance can retire to tropical islands. Their work here is done, because everyone in your care now understands the value of social and informal learning. Except maybe they don’t. Maybe you’re having trouble convincing your boss that her task force is not a community of practice. Maybe your top-down Yammer implementation has yielded more tumbleweeds than users. Perhaps it’s because, in fact, no one is making the connection between the breakthroughs in networking that they can plainly see and whatever it is that you do. Maybe you should brag about your personal learning network. In this new world, those in our care probably find it harder – not easier – to square the existence of this wikiHow entry and your job as conductor of whatever they’ve been led to think formalized training is. Do you exemplify the benefits of social and informal learning in your own work life? Do you document successes of social learning? Are you watching and listening to the concerns of your co-workers, providing the right nudge when needed, and openly sourcing your information? Are you connecting your peers with relatable thought leadership or community resources that you’ve found valuable? How about using technology to make spaces for serendipitous learning – loosely organized, de-escalated learning, free from expectations but endowed with purpose? As I’ve said before, I love our kind of people, and not just for their unfailingly sparkling personalities. Every day, they are useful to me in my work, and every day I make it known that I am bringing fire to those in my care because of my associations. In design meetings, I nip errant learning styles talk in the bud. I stay up-to-date on the development of Project Tin Can and use what I know to rethink learning management systems. I experiment with Google Hangouts. I make it easy for myself to be a node in the network and I make sure that people know that part of my value is being as connected as I am. While I probably spend more time talking about #lrnchat than I do participating in it these days, I’ve been known by more than one boss as ‘the Twitter guy.’ I’m proud that I eventually stopped being ‘the Twitter guy’ – that is, I stopped being just a tolerated, quirky evangelist for the platform when I stopped telling people how valuable Twitter is and started using it very publicly to inform my discourse in the workplace. (As Jane Bozarth says, “Google gets you links. Twitter gets you answers.) As a result, the questions that I get around social media are less of the “what good is Twitter?” variety and more about how to use social learning tools to their best effect. As I rely on a large, diverse learning network to help me be competent and prescient, I hope to show (not tell) that I am here to solve problems, not simply build courses or teach classes. I can suggest and employ social and informal learning strategies in part because they’re already working: social media tools, content curation, collaboration, and networked learning are making me better at what I do. Craig Wiggins has been helping people create and manage learning experiences for the last 10 years. He is the eLearning Instructional Design Strategist for the Corporate Executive Board’s Corporate Leadership Council, where he manages the creation of meaningful distance learning and performance solutions. Craig holds a B.A. in anthropology and an M.Ed. in curriculum development, and spends a lot of time thinking about how to sneak usability, accessibility, and proper task analysis into the mix. In his natural habitat, he is usually storyboarding on wall-sized whiteboards or pontificating on Google+.

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ASTD Study Shows Social Media has High Value for Learning and Development

Social media is a force and trend that should be embraced, according to new research from the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD). A new research report, The Rise of Social Media: Enhancing Collaboration and Productivity across Generations finds that regardless of generation, workers in the United States believe that social media tools have an important role to play in workplace learning and development. The study also finds that most companies have a long way to go when it comes to implementing social media tools for the learning function. While the vast majority of respondents used social media in their personal lives, only 24 percent said their informal learning at work included social media. However, more than 80 percent of survey respondents said social media tools would become an important part of the learning function within the next three years. The findings show very strong and significant correlations between high use of social media tools at work and respondents’ opinions that the tools help them get more and better work done, learn more truly useful things, and learn more in less time. The Rise of Social Media: Enhancing Collaboration and Productivity across Generations shows that social media tools have considerable value for the learning function. ASTD President and CEO Tony Bingham says, “Understanding the huge impact Web 2.0 technologies have on how the workforce learns is critical to engaging employees and customers, and ultimately, critical for an organization’s growth and success.” The topic of social media in the learning function will be addressed by Bingham at ASTD’s 2010 International Conference and Exposition on May 17. For more information on The Rise of Social Media: Enhancing Collaboration and Productivity across Generations visit www.store.astd.org.

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How Personality Type Can Affect Burnout, Agile Learning, and Team Dynamics

Join two personality type experts for a lively, interactive discussion of the impact personality type can have on burnout, agile learning, and team dynamics. Three case illustrations will be presented with a focus on situational discovery, self-awareness and understanding, and talent development. You will learn: how to conduct a personality type debrief session that goes beyond simple personality type classification how to identify the root causes of team dynamic breakdown how leveraging a dominant mental function can affect agile learning what to do when the coachee or client is experiencing burnout.

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