208 Search results

For the term "Human Resources".

Human Resources Organizations Lack Critical Skills for Success in 2011

(From PRNewswire) — Bersin & Associates, a world-class research and consulting firm that empowers HR organizations to drive bottom-line impact, today announced the launch of new research that shows many HR organizations lack the skills they need to succeed in 2011. The study, which included surveys and interviews with more than 720 global organizations, found that overall spending levels, organization structure, and team size have far less impact on business performance than the skills of the HR professionals themselves. The resulting report, The High-Impact HR Organization: Top 10 Best Practices on the Road to Excellence is a foundational piece of research in Bersin & Associates’ new HR Research Practice, which offers benchmarks, tools, case studies, operational frameworks, and proven service models that define best-practice human resources organizations. “This research clearly shows that the days of bloated HR organizations focused on administrative tasks are over,” said Josh Bersin, chief executive officer and president, Bersin & Associates. “Lean, technology-enabled, well-trained HR teams are able to take advantage of modern talent practices and partner with business leaders to drive impact.” The research also determined that the decades-old “HR generalist” model is no longer effective unless these individuals are highly trained and connected to senior business leaders. The key competencies that drive results today are familiarity with integrated talent management, understanding of workforce planning, and comfort with social networking and HR technology. These findings emerged from a two-year global benchmarking study that looked at 14 talent management and HR effectiveness measures across global businesses. The measures included a company’s ability to source the best talent, hire and onboard top candidates, identify and develop leaders, build a culture of learning, allocate compensation effectively, and drive high performance through coaching and feedback. Read more.

Dubai: Human resources conference attracts more than 30 world’s best speakers in strategy and expertise

(From Zawya.com) — The International Human Resources Conference and Exhibition (IHRC 2011), hosted by the Federal Authority for Government Human Resources (FAHR), will bring more than 30 world’s best known thought leaders and innovators in human resource development and organisational reforms to the UAE. The conference and exhibition, to be held in Dubai from Jan. 19 to 20, will set the stage for a global exchange of knowledge and ideas on integrating efficient HR management into the strategic plans and policies of governments and organisations across the world. Over 300 HR practitioners, heads of states, and experts are expected to attend IHRC 2011, held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President and Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai. Speakers at the conference will analyse regional and international trends and challenges in education, job creation and talent management, linking the debates to the central theme of the conference, “Human Resources: the Sustainable Capital for the New Era.” The conference has already attracted academics, strategists, trainers and consultants from world-leading centres of excellence in knowledge, innovations, leadership and management and from trend-setting public and private sector organisations worldwide. Read more.

Economics of Human Resources: Productivity and Efficiency

This article discusses the economics of the workplace where the more productive, the highly efficient, and the more faster and agile workers race ahead of the slower ones. Among other things, the key themes in this article relate to how machines replaced workers, computers replaced the white collar ones, and how the present trend of advanced computing and robotics are replacing the knowledge workers.

How HR (Human Resources) Function Can Save Time by Automating Routine Tasks

Most of the tasks that the HR function does are routine and repetitive and hence, can be automated. With the automation of the recruitment activities through the use of AI and Analytics, the HR staff can save much time and use the saved time and resources to focus on higher value-adding activities. Apart from this, the HR function can also automate the other tasks such as Payroll and some Performance Management tasks. This article examines these themes with an analysis of how automation creates value for organizations.

The Economics of Human Resources in the Informal Economy

This article examines the economics of human resources in the informal economy from multiple perspectives. By explaining terms such as Daily wage workers, Arbitrage of hiring, Precariat, and the Digital Economy, this article intends to introduce the readers to how the economics of human resources in the informal economy works. The key theme in this article is that informal workers operate in a vastly different universe than the formal sector workers.

Role of Human Resources in Employee Development

Human Resource professionals play an essential role in employee development activities. Lets discuss the importance of HR Department in Employee Development.

Economics of Human Resources Management: Hiring, Firing, and Reward Systems

This article examines how the HR decisions in recent years are being driven by economics more than any other concerns given the emphasis on cost cutting and increasing profits. The key themes in this article are that potential and current employees must be cognizant not only of how well they perform or how poorly they have fared but also about how much they cost to the firms and hence, be prepared accordingly.

How Silicon Valley Firms are Implementing Innovative Human Resources Policies

Silicon Valley firms are known for their workplace cultures that encourage and nurture innovation. This article examines some of the Human Resources policies that have made the Silicon Valley firms the workplaces of the future. This section also discusses some recent controversies that have arisen about gender discrimination and minority harassment. The key theme in this article is that Silicon Valley firms must take the lead in reshaping the workplace of the future just as they have invented the future for the world.

Preparing to Manage Human Resources | Coursera

Preparing to Manage Human Resources from University of Minnesota. One way or another, all employees are managed. But approaches to managing employees varying from employee-to-employee, job-to-job, manager-to-manager, organization-to-organization, …

Using Human Resources Technology | SkyPrep

Managers cannot deny the impact technology has had on the workplace. From streamlining everyday processes to fostering easier communications between remote

SunGard K-12 – Financial and human resources software for school

About SunGard K-12 Education SunGard® K-12 offers software solutions and professional services designed to help K-12 schools and school districts support student achievement and operational efficiency. PLUS 360 is a single integrated suite of software solutions for the management of student information, assessment and curriculum, special education, and financial and human resources. K-12 Financial & Human Resources Management A Solution for Every District Finance and human resources management needs vary from district to district. A quick analysis of your needs will identify which SunGard K-12 solution best fits your requirements. Our eFinancePLUS™ and BusinessPLUS™ school software are comprehensive finance and...

Changing the Game: The 9-Vector View of Human Performance

As the federal government seeks to maximize resources amid mounting deficits, organizational change is a top priority. In the private sector, the slow economic recovery is forcing companies to reevaluate their current business practices and explore new approaches for enhancing productivity and increasing profitability….

Self-organized groups and the methods and ethics of accessing learning resources

Jay Cross has posted some further reflections on the Hole in the Wall project that was presented in a keynote speech by Sugata Mitra at Online Educa Berlin two weeks ago. Although the Hole in the Wall has been going for at least 7 years and has been deployed (as Sugata told me privately) extensively not only in various locations within India but also in Africa and Cambodia, confirming the potentially universal application of the results, the deeper findings of the ongoing experiment only came home to me in Berlin, which — incidentally and somewhat ironically — perhaps reveals that public presentations by an active speaker in front of a passive audience may occasionally be an effective way of transmitting knowledge. This post can also be read as my personal answer to the Big Question for December, since the Hole in the Wall (HiW) was indeed the most significant revelation of the year for me. It’s always pleasant to see the experimental confirmation of one’s favorite hypotheses (concerning both social learning and e-learning as a resource), but as with all empirical evidence, I’ve discovered in HiW material for extending the original hypotheses and introducing new dimensions (e.g. the organizational, the psychological and the ethical). It seems to me that the fundamental key to the success of HiW is the notion of “self-organized groups” who learn on their own. If education is to become truly non-invasive, as Jay suggests, it must refrain from defining both the goals and the means to reach them, entrusting the groups with this task. If educational gurus (authorities) notice that a group is neglecting what is considered “essential” in the curriculum (for whatever reason, whether it’s basic security, survival or inculcating an existing set of values), the group could be challenged to account for why they may be neglecting a certain topic or reminded of the interest in pursuing it. Respecting the self-organizing group and its decision-making capacity is the sine qua non of success. It also happens to be the absolute opposite of the organizational principles of traditional education and training. It’s worth reflecting on how learners in self-organized groups use external resources to solve problems. One of Sugata’s anecdotes in Berlin concerned a girl who was overwhelmed by the exposure to the micro-biology courses in English (a language she had to learn as the medium of instruction). She stole some money from her mother to phone her uncle in Delhi, who she hoped might be able to explain in simple terms what DNA was. His vague and unscientific but nevertheless informative answer gave her the minimum she needed to begin constructing her understanding of the lessons she wanted to explore. In other words, everything one already knows or has access to in the world becomes a potential resource for building rather than simply receiving knowledge, traditionally from a single authoritative source. This is probably also the best answer to Andrew Keen – another keynote speaker in Berlin whose stock-in-trade is lamenting Web 2.0’s loss of the sense of established authority common to traditional education and the Web 1.0 — because it demonstrates that even sources of knowledge (the uncle) that are not fully reliable can contribute to the construction and refinement of knowledge. Being exposed to a multiplicity of sources and entering into dialogue with them is the best way of evaluating the components of knowledge and understanding relationships between complementary elements. Inevitably such increasingly complex networks of knowledge (and interpretation of existing knowledge) produce a more diversified intellectual culture capable of appreciating value rather than relying on arbitrary criteria, such as university degrees or media-induced standards of celebrity: see for example this interesting article in the LA Times on the Trump University. I expect that within the family (in Indian culture) the mother could forgive her daughter for the theft. It’s worth noticing that in some cultures – and especially within educational institutions — that theft would not be forgiven and the child would be branded as a real or potential delinquent. It’s the old Jean Valjean problem that our western cultures are still struggling with, where the “rule of law” can easily become a rigid regime of “law and order” and human potential stifled with a vengeance. Sugata told me that his results apply strictly to an age range of 6 to 13. He wouldn’t commit to drawing any conclusions about how the findings might apply to older children and even less to adults. It’s obvious that a similar experimental setting would be difficult to imagine. But I believe that parallels can be found, that the principles concerning the motivational factors of learning are similar and that, with some imagination in the “learning design”, similar results could be produced in adults. The place to begin, of course, is CoPs since what the HiW children effectively did was to build and run their own CoP. And isn’t “self-organized group” the best and most succinct definition of a CoP?

ASTD Offers New Training Resources for Public Sector Professionals

Government agencies, like private sector organizations, continually look for ways to increase efficiencies and improve agency performance. Having a knowledgeable, skilled workforce is a critical step in meeting those goals. To help managers and learning professionals build their talent, the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) has several new offerings tailored specifically to the needs of professionals in the public sector. One certificate program, “Managing Talent for Mission Success,” is designed for managers and supervisors, training and development practitioners, and HR specialists in the federal government. This practical two-day workshop will enable participants to better leverage their role in the organization to more effectively inform, influence, and lead talent management in support of mission achievement. Participants will explore a six step process: Other ASTD certificate programs explore topics relevant in the public sector like training design and delivery, coaching, human performance improvement, managing organizational knowledge, and measuring and evaluating learning. ASTD offers other beneficial resources to public sector employees. Through its content licensing program ASTD enables agencies to deliver learning libraries to agencies’ protected websites, providing employees with access to cutting edge training materials. The Public Manager, a quarterly journal dedicated to encouraging professionalism and high performance in all levels of government, gives public managers and executives the opportunity to write and share ideas about critical public management issues. ASTD Press offers books that can help managers and training professionals in the public sector such as High-Impact Middle Management: Solutions for Today’s Busy Public Sector Managers, written by Lisa Haneberg. More information about ASTD’s resources for the public sector is available at http://www.astd.org/ASTD/Government/.

ATD Human Capital Virtual Summit: Leadership for Today’s Workplace

Developing leaders in your organization starts with knowing your workforce. Implementing the wrong leadership strategy can mean losing time, resources, or even your employees. The Human Capital Virtual Summit: Leadership for Today’s Workforce is the second annual event hosted by ATD to take a deeper dive into leadership’s role in developing talent. This event is focused on the different strategies available to today’s leaders, and how each can best align with their unique workforce to drive…

Water Resources Management and Policy | Coursera

Water Resources Management and Policy from University of Geneva. Water management today is faced with new challenges such as climate change or the effects of human activity. Public and private stakeholders who are active in this field must …

Innovation Design In Education – ASIDE: Visualizing The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights

Innovative design crosses over all aspects of education. The American Society for Innovation Design in Education, or ASIDE, seeks to infuse curriculum with new approaches to teaching and thinking. Integrating the design of information into the daily conversation is an essential part of the teacher’s toolkit and the purpose of the ASIDE blog. The underpinning of innovation and educational design is based on looking at the information available and communicating meaning for a world of learners. Thinking like a designer can transform the way children learn. ASIDE’s goal is to bring together as much information, resources and supportive scholarship in one place for teaching and learning.

Epicor HCM – Human capital management solution for school

Epicor HCM – HR Management Software Today’s economy demands a more proactive, strategic role for the HR department. As competition for critical resources intensifies, managers, employees and candidates are demanding more from HR and human resource information systems (HRIS), moving beyond self-service to secure  direct access to relevant information and processes whether in the office or on the road. Epicor® Human Capital Management (HCM) provides these capabilities and more, helping you to manage your globally dispersed workforce, improve human resource processes, and enhance employee satisfaction for greater efficiency and cost savings across the enterprise. Comprehensive HR Management Software Epicor HCM automates your HR processes, enabling...

Dress Codes for Work – Best Skills

How you dress is important for work. Use these human resources tips to compare the differences between formal, business casual and casual dress codes, and decide which is best for your workplace.

Discrimination in the Workplace – Best Skills

Discrimination by gender, age, disability, orientation, ethnicity, religion and any other form is forbidden in the workplace. Follow these human resources tips to manage and avoid workplace discrimination.