195 Search results

For the term "Business Planning".

Business Continuity Management Planning around the World

Different countries have differing risks. The companies have to ensure that their business continuity management plans are according to the specific risk that the location in which they are based carries.

Social Business Model and Planning for Social Innovation | Coursera

Social Business Model and Planning for Social Innovation from Copenhagen Business School. In this course we will take the social business opportunity that you have identified in the first course to a higher level. Specifically, you will develop a …

Business English: Planning & Negotiating | Coursera

Business English: Planning & Negotiating from University of Washington. In this course, the context is hosting an event and finding an appropriate venue for it. You will learn language and strategies for successful negotiations culminating in a …

How to Plan Your Business Travel: 13 Steps (with Pictures)

How to Plan Your Business Travel. Planning a work-related trip can be a stressful endeavor. On top of your usual travel concerns, you also have to keep your mind focused on the business aspect of your trip. Business travel doesn’t have to…

Event Planning Resources and Advice – Best Skills

Are you always planning parties and events for your friends? Maybe a career in event planning is right for you! Learn how to get a job in event planning or start your own business, and get tips and best practices for planning everything from Bar Mitzvahs to weddings.

Small Business Resources and Advice – Best Skills

Is today the day you start your own business? Learn everything you need to run a successful small business, including business planning, accounting and bookkeeping, small business financing and loans, sales and marketing, hiring employees, and more.

The Business Plan: Not Just a Blueprint – Best Skills

Business planning is a vital component of starting and growing a successful enterprise. Many different templates and variations of business plans exist, so you must choose the right one for your purpose and your enterprise. Having a business and knowing what to do with it are very separate issues and creating a well-executed business plan for the right reasons will enhance the odds that your venture will be one of the ones to succeed.

Event Planning Basics – Best Skills

Learn the basics of event planning as a small business career. Use these resources and checklist for those who are involved in planning corporate, association, non-profit and social events.

Self-Employed and Small-Business IRAs – Best Skills

Self-employed and small-business IRAs have some benefits that set them apart from the traditional 401(k). Use these retirement planning resources to find out how self-employed IRAs work, and whether one is right for your business.

Organization, Strategy and Planning – Best Skills

Good managers need to organize, strategize and plan effectively. Use these resources to improve your strategic planning, business organization and reorganization, competitive intelligence, benchmarking and other related skills.

The Bottleneck – A Lack of Succession Planning in HR

We are all faced with a hobbling paradox. Most agree that employees make or break an enterprise, but the HR team often seems to be constantly catching up. Business leaders complain that they have to “break in” new HR people, and that individuals with HR degrees in college are not overly useful. Finally, when business leaders do praise HR, it is an individual person who gets praised, not the department. Obviously, this impacts Training and Development efforts directly. Any real effort to develop Big Skills requires a trust on the sponsor’s part and a competency on the deliverer’s part that too often are just not there. And any T+D efforts not around Big Skills is just treading water for the training group. As I work with global organizations, I have recently been aware of a staggering truth. Most HR groups have no succession planning for themselves. This is true even when HR works hard to create succession planning for every other part of the enterprise. If this is true, it both provides an explanation and a surprisingly easy remedy for the Hobbled HR group. And best of all, HR is already good at it: they know the tools of identification, rotational assignments, fast tracking, retention for strategic talent, partnering with business groups on critical projects, and global exposure. We have all heard the jokes about the lawyer who died without leaving a will, or the shoemaker’s children going barefoot. So maybe it is time for the doctor to heal thyself.

Survey: Small Businesses Getting Ready to Hire

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.–( BUSINESS WIRE)–The nation’s unemployment rate may have hit a 26-year high in September but many small business owners are getting ready to hire. The latest Intuit Payroll survey from Intuit Inc. (Nasdaq:INTU) finds that nearly half of the small business owners surveyed, 44 percent, are planning to hire new employees within the next 12 months. At the same time, many small business owners believe that benefits are key to attracting new hires but are finding them difficult to afford. “Economists may have declared the recession over, but on Main Street, unemployment figures are what really matter,” said Nora Denzel, senior vice president of Intuit’s Employee Management Solutions Division, which helps more than 1 million small businesses easily and affordably manage their payroll. “There are struggles ahead, nobody is uncorking the champagne bottle quite yet, but we are starting to see small signs of optimism.” Read more.

Succession Planning Presents Challenges for Most Companies

Future success for any business depends in part on who is leading the business, yet according to new research from the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) the majority of companies admit their efforts in succession planning are weak. As the global economy struggles out of the recession it is incumbent on business leaders to identify key positions, critical knowledge and skills, and the talent needed to meet short- and long-term goals, as well as put in place a working process for developing and advancing employees in the succession pipeline. Despite this demand only 14 percent of companies surveyed by ASTD said their organization’s succession planning efforts were successful to a high or very high degree. ASTD surveyed leaders from 1,247 organizations for its new study Improving Succession Plans: Harnessing the Power of Learning and Development. Key findings include: The study also offers recommendations for creating metrics, candidate selection, and key practices to cope with barriers to effective plans. A “Lessons Learned” section shares some of the wisdom gained from study respondents. Improving Succession Plans: Harnessing the Power of Learning and Development is free to ASTD members and may be downloaded from the ASTD Store at www.store.astd.org.

New York State Office of the State Comptroller Redefines Standard of Business Analysis Excellence

Background The New York State Office of the State Comptroller (NYSOSC) in Albany maintains a broad scope of responsibility unmatched by similar offices in the United States. As the state’s chief fiscal and accounting officer, the Comptroller is a separately elected state-wide official whose primary duties include managing and investing the State’s cash assets, auditing government operations, paying all NYS employees, reviewing State contracts, overseeing the fiscal affairs of local governments including New York City, and operating two of the state’s retirement systems. As an agency charged with monitoring the effective financial operation of numerous other agencies and entities, the NYSOSC understands the need to carefully maintain its own project management (PM) and business analysis (BA) capabilities. Therefore, the Office engages in regular self-assessment and performance improvement in these areas. The ChallengeNYSOSC has built a reputation for continually advancing project management best practices through its PM Center of Excellence (CoE). However, realizing that enhanced business analysis practices can also increase project success and user support, as well as heighten customer satisfaction, the agency has sought, since 2006, to improve its business analysis practices by instituting a Business Analysis Center of Excellence (BACoE). NYSOSC performance improvement programs had primarily benefited PM teams prior, and support had not been available for the advancement of BA teams. By promoting BA competencies, knowledge management, enterprise analysis skills and practices similarly to the PM program, NYSOSC sought to achieve comparable, positive results. Strategic PlanningThe agency’s cross-division Business Analysis Work Group completed a strategic report in 2006 presenting the benefits of advancing NYSOSC’s use of business analysis and making next-step recommendations, including the launch of a BACoE. In 2007, the second phase of the project was launched to begin to develop and support business analysis as an organizational resource. Kevin Belden, Deputy Comptroller and CIO, and Kirk Schanzenbach, Director of the Program Management Office (PgMO), were executive sponsors; and Barbara Ash, Assistant Director for BA in the PgMO, was the project manager. The project team consisted of numerous representatives from BA units across the agency. To provide counsel on industry best practices, and to resolve issues that were impeding progress, the project team enlisted the help of ESI International. “Having worked with ESI in the past to build our project management and business skills capabilities,” said Schanzenbach, “we were confident that they were the best partner in achieving our BA goals.” ESI began by working with NYSOSC leadership and the project team to outline unifying objectives for BA and PM skills areas, including the need to: The Solution In cooperation with ESI, NYSOSC determined the key strategies to ensure a successful program. Foremost among these were: To support the program launch, ESI designed and delivered a two-day, project kick-off workshop that centered on the program’s four-part learning framework and targeted development of knowledge, skills, ability and attitude. Day one introduced the program to senior management and focused on developing best practices in alignment with BACoE operating standards. Executive activities included competitive, interactive group exercises that helped to define and prioritize goals around developing the BACoE. Day two introduced the program to front line business analysts and ensured a common understanding of BA concepts and executive directives. Following the kick-off, the team worked in subcommittees on project deliverables, received best practice advice, and exercised skills and competencies through coaching exercises. Special attention was also given to evaluating and treating such problematic areas as standards and methodologies topics for the BA group. “This intensive learning experience was very well received as a serious enhancement to the traditional instructor-led effort.” said Ash. “Participants also felt that it accelerated the program launch significantly compared to previous programs.” Toward Change In the early months of the program, ESI participated in regular group meetings and calls in order to provide coaching and to reinforce goals and specific training targets. While ESI continues to deliver essential counsel, the NYSOSC has quickly achieved the competency to offer coaching and mentoring using internal resources. Other significant program accomplishments and benefits to date include: Championed by executive sponsors Belden and Schanzenbach and project manager Ash, the internal team continues to recommend and oversee BA learning programs and progress, as well as support the advancement of BA maturity.

New Survey from Krauthammer: Around 80% of businesses feel resistant to current difficult business climate

KRAUTHAMMER | London, UK 80% of international businesses feel relatively resistant when it comes to the worsening business climate. 55% will defend their investments in ‘behavioural development’ programmes in areas such as leadership, management and sales. On the downside, 20% say that they will cut their budgets. This and other findings are the results of a probe conducted by Krauthammer in late Autumn 2008. 34% of the respondents forecast a poor business climate for 2009. Around 20% believe they have “low resistance” to a difficult business climate and are planning to cut their behavioural development budgets in line with their predictions. However, over twice as many – 55% – feel resistant – and 42% even plan to raise development budgets. “The news is mixed. The most positive signal we can distill from our probe is that companies will prioritise initiatives with a real and measurable impact. So consultants that excel in sophisticated forms of body-shopping will probably be hit as hard as temporary personnel providers”, comments Ronald Meijers, Co-chairman of the Board of Krauthammer. *) body shopping typically implies filling temporary competence gaps rather than structurally improving a company’s performance. The respondents will defend training and coaching more vigorously than they will consulting. And as many CEOs admit their difficulties in predicting results for 2009, leadership training will be most defended – by 53% of respondents, followed by sales training (47%) and management training (42%). Crossfunctional training such as IT- and language skills will be least defended, the probe suggests. When it comes to coaching, too – leadership, management and sales coaching will be most defended. Overall, training seems less vulnerable than coaching – training will be cut by fewer numbers of people than its coaching equivalents. According to the probe, consulting budgets will be defended by around a third of businesses. Least popular, the probe suggests, will be consulting in “hard issues” such as strategies, operations and structures – only 19% of the respondents would defend it. A combination of “soft” and “hard” issues such as sales effectiveness will be most resilient of consulting propositions – 33% of respondents say they will protect budgets in this area. Nick Girling Senior Consultant, Office Leader UK, Krauthammer Tel: +44 20 8770 7200 Mobile: +44 7900 5648 79 E-mail: nick.girling@krauthammer.com Coaching, consulting and training company Krauthammer assists clients worldwide in successfully uniting permanent people development and sustainable business performance. It offers major change implementation and human capital development programmes at the individual, team and corporate levels optimising the personal effectiveness of leaders and managers, salespeople and negotiators, trainers, coaches, consultants and support staff. Established in 1971, Krauthammer International has 300 consultants and employees, delivering services in over 50 countries, in 15 languages. International consistency and the ongoing professional development of the consultants are ensured by four annual Krauthammer University sessions where every consultant spends between 2 and 3 weeks per year. www.krauthammer.com

Increase Business Capacity to Increase Sales

Analyzing Organizational Capacity Analyzing Capacity within a business organization can be one of the most challenging of the sales training foundational competencies. The reason is because a positive cash flow from sales revenue generated by a high performance sales force ensures that the company can afford to risk making strategic market decisions. It needs to be able to service and deliver quality products that can be sold to grow the business. What is the function of Business Capacity? Business capacity involves analyzing, monitoring, measuring, evaluating, managing, and planning all functions of the company for financial, statistical, and behavioral data. This process allows business leaders to clearly identify how to grow and sustain the health of the organization. This includes: technological, operational and human performance. You can perform activities that align and maximize capacity measurements and improvements within any part of the organization. According to the ASTD World Class Selling, the definition of “Analyzing Organizational Capacity is to: “Assess and weigh competing requirements against available resources to minimize risk, ensure quality deliverables, and balance capabilities with capacity.” Key actions would include: 1. Assessing resources accurately 2. Balancing risk with goal achievement when determining next steps Should I integrate the capacity of my SALES or TRAINING department? Absolutely! It is extremely valuable for you to understand the financial, operational and human requirements and costs to run your training department. As a Sales or Talent Management Sales Trainer, you are responsible for the knowledge management of the sales team and its’ performance outcomes. The health of your own training department is vulnerable to business capacity shifts and changes. The better you understand how analyzing capacity works the better your departmental efforts will be measured for your own success as a Trainer! How does this relate to Sales Training? Your sales team’s performance in any given month will reflect the increases or decreases in the “capacity” to which the organization can utilize internal or external resources. In this case, we are talking about the companies’ ability to access financial resources that come from new and existing sales revenue. Sales revenue is the anchor of life for all business, The company will suffer in capacity when a sales organization is not strong. The business must be able to “afford” to adapt constant change and if it cannot do that without strong sales leadership, revenue increase and consistent sales productivity. If the organization be able to adapt to capacity changes or sustainability is threatened.

Exhibiting 101: Risky Business

An expensive server rack commits suicide off a 4-foot-tall shipping dock. A forklift skewers a carton of exhibit graphics. Demo equipment gets stolen in transit. What do all three of these situations have in common? They have all happened to me. Thankfully, in every case I had planned ahead and placed insurance on my clients’ exhibit properties to cover their losses. As exhibit managers, insuring against losses that we might incur isn’t usually on the top of our to-do lists. Logistics, deadlines, and troubleshooting often take precedence over identifying, evaluating, and managing the financial risks of exhibiting. But trade show-related disasters are bound to happen. Author and risk-management expert Charles Robert Tremper says, “The first step in the risk-management process is to acknowledge the reality of risk. Denial is a common tactic that substitutes deliberate ignorance for thoughtful planning.” There are basically four types of coverage exhibitors can secure to mitigate common exhibiting risks. Read the entire article.

A Business Case Built to Last: The GREAT Pyramid of Training

Building a Business Case: Your Final Answer. Building a business case is a sales competency of the ASTD World Class Sales Competency Model. Designing a business case can be a useful management tool that is pivotal to an organization’s success. It is used in supporting the overall planning and decision making for both operational and financial decision making that surrounds company products, services and solutions. Build Cross Functional Learning Systems As a Sales Trainer and Sales Learning Professional , developing a firm understanding of business operations and cross functional relationships will help you collaborate with others who work with you.A Sales Trainer can teach many things to the sales team to help build sales competencies. Show Proven and Tested Methodologies Learn to teach proven approaches and closing techniques that establish the business value of your proposal with credibility and impact. Sales Trainers can design practical training modules in business case selling. Use a business case to help decision makers follow a predetermined process or format to cover all factors being considered. This would include showing complex data that proves your case and helps justify the decision to close even when there may be several decision makers involved to review the case. A strong business case can also be used as a performance management tool to identify sales and strategic opportunities, and manage best practices. It can turn sales data into action oriented intelligence to drive engagement, measurement, and accountability to drive business value. Sales Leaders can help the team set goals and measure progress more accurately. The Sales Team can collaborate more effectively by following the process mapping which will improve their ability to compete. Using sales training methods and key performance indicators that follow the ASTD Sales Training Competency Model framework, you will be able to provide ways to help Sales Leaders to gain insight make better decisions and take more effective action using real time Key Performance Indicators (KPI) to better track and manage the sales process – getting to the root cause of a particular sales issue.

Strategic Account Planning: The 5 Imperatives

Account planning is an essential part of a high-performing sales organization. It brings together critical information about your customer, your competitors, and your strategy to win business. The account plan forces the team to acknowledge the larger revenue and product goals and agree on a set of actions to move your team toward those goals. The act of incorporating a new activity into an already saturated schedule is tough. The route to making this planning into a long-term habit is crowded…

10 Steps to Successful Strategic Planning

Create a dynamic strategic plan, central to your organizations ability to make critical business decisions, with this step-by-step walk through the strategic planning process. 10 Steps to Successful Strategic Planning offers a simple 10 step process to assessing your priorities, organizing your goals, and getting your organization on the path to planned success. Loaded with worksheets, exercises, tips, tools, checklists, and other easy-to-use and interactive learning aids, this title guides you through the entire strategic planning process.Part of the ASTD 10 Steps series .

Getting Ready to Start Your MLM Business

With detailed planning and preparation, you will find it smoother to get started with the Multi Level Marketing business. Lets discuss the various points that you should keep in mind before starting your own MLM business.